Any 'closed Doors' Restaurant Recommendations?

Patagone

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Hi, Patagonian country boy will be heading to BsAs for a few days coming month.

I have read several articles about the closed door restaurants, but most focus on 700pesos+ venues that are not so secret, but rather just exclusive.

I do like the idea of dining in a chef's house, and have some good food that doesn't involve bife y empanadas.

Does anybody have any tips/experiences to share?

Cheers
 

lucha54

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I always find it so weird when people just want to go to a puerta cerrada for the sake of it... but here are some cheaper ones:
Cocina Sunae (south east asian) - 250 for 4 courses
Gula (south east asian mostly vietnamese) - ~250 for 5-6 small courses
MASA tacos (fusion tacos) - I think it's pay as you wish but maybe with a 120 minimum.
Casa Saltshaker is one that is in the house of the chef, the rest I don't know (Sunae doesn't live in the same place as her restaurant anymore although it is in her former house)
 

arnolddavid

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Experiences to share? I recently tried Paladar Buenos Aires. Never again.

I have eaten at this closed door restaurant a couple of times in the past and thought it quite good. As I am Jewish and from NYC my curiosity was piqued when I received their email notice that the menu for the weekend would be Jew food specifically borscht with salmon kneidelach, pastrami as main course, and banana strudel (350 with flights of wine, 250 without wine).
I came with low expectations since I know Katz's, Zabar's, Pastrami King, Carnegie deli and could not imagine pastrami advertised as a main course in BA anything near as good as that approaching the stuff served in the aforementioned NY joints. Despite my low expectations I came away very disappointed.

The borscht served luke warm tasted like ground beets boiled to the point the flavor was just about totally eliminated. The salmon kneidlach were also flavorless. I would not have been able to identify the little round balls in the dish as fresh salmon...perhaps canned salmon.The mascarpone in lieu of sour cream added panache, but couldn't rescue this dish.

The thick 2 or 3 slabs of pastrami that followed were worse. Man, where did they get this recipe? The meat was too highly spiced, too fatty and lacking in any semblance to my prior pastrami experiences (of which there have literally been hundreds). It was a spicy roast beef more like a poor Chinese dish than the real thing.

The "prepostre" and postre of banana strudel were also failures. Advertised as crispy, the postre was a soggy banana accompanied by a bit of chocolate coated ice cream that vaguely reminded me of a Mr. Klondike bar, only not as tasty.

Service was not quite as poor as the food ,but it, too, was below acceptable levels. And of course, the check was 100 pesos more than it should have been.

I could have forgiven chef owner Pablo for this travesty because, at least, he made an effort to add a gourmet touch to basic Jewish cuisine. It was a failure, but thanks for trying. When I wrote to him the next day advising him that he should not serve this menu again and asking him if he wanted further specific comments (I have occasionally written about food for a couple of local publications) he wrote back "banning" me from his restaurant. Talk about classic Argentine arrogance!. No harm. No foul. Frankly the meal was so bad I would likely not have returned to Paladar BA.
 

Ceviche

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The closed door restuarants are over priced and making a fool of "foolish" tourists and "starving" expats.
 

Girino

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What is exactly behind these close doors?
Are they in a house? Or are like real restaurant with professional kitchen, just with doors open upon invitation only?
If there any guarantee on the food or the hygienic standard? Just curious.
 

Ries

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A closed door restaurant is usually in a private home, but run by accomplished professional chefs.
Since the laws, particularly regarding employment, are so byzantine and strict here, many people shy away from opening "real" businesses.
I have eaten at several of these, over the last 7 years.
They are always delicious, clean, and "real".
NO, there are no guarantees- but life without risk and adventure is boring and bland.
There is no guarantee of a hygienic standard anywhere in BsAs, though.
Me, I eat choripans from out of trailers, fuggazetta standing at the counter, and sit down with the fancy people at white tablecloth restaurants- its all good.

Usually there is one seating per night, two or three nights a week, with a fixed menu, (usually with vegetarian choices) with or without wine pairings.
They are usually less expensive than the higher end fancy restaurants in town, and the food is usually better.

You cannot go wrong with Casa Felix- he can really cook, and tends to do meat free (but including seafood) menus that are unique and delicious.
 

Ceviche

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If there any guarantee on the food or the hygienic standard?

No guarantee. Its like a illegal business with no government control.

I did all that *closed restaurant* drama when I had arrived here. Always found it over priced and nothing out of the world. And I do not like to support illegal business
 

Girino

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Okay, thanks. I was just wondering if they actually serve the meal in their living room, where they might have pet in the house.
It wouldn't bother me, but I believe it could bother someone else and thus I couldn't find a reason why to pay more.
 
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