buttermilk pancake batter or waffle mix

#1
hola,
i have a new bar & cafe and will be opening soon to serve breakfast. having no luck locating the ingredients for buttermilk pancakes - no buttermilk apparently. also looking for ingredients to make waffles.
steak, eggs, home fires, cereal, fruit, juices, coffee, oatmeal , pastries - no problem.
buttermilk - big problem
same thing on sour cream. anyone have any leads i would greatly appreciate them.
thankyou in advance
 
#2
I bring back COSCO sized pancake mix everytime I come back.Tell you what though, make sure you post when you start opening for B'fast and I'll be there on the weekends! Good luck, and lut us know if you find the stuff.
 
#3
Sour milk is a good substitute for buttermilk.I have found Baking powder, the brand name is Royal and it comes in a red foil packet. Povre para Hornear is the thing to ask for. Good luck and keep us posted.Annie~
 
#4
K~Looks like you could make buttermilk. I got curious so I went to discover this:Buttermilk

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia




Buttermilk, low fat

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)


Energy 40 kcal 170 kJ





Carbohydrates
4.8 g


Fat
0.9 g


Protein
3.3 g


Calcium 116 mg
12%





Percentages are relative to US

recommendations for adults.



Buttermilk is a fermented dairy product produced from cow's milk
with a characteristically sour taste. The product is made in one of two
ways. Originally, buttermilk was the liquid left over from churning butter from cream. Today, this is called traditional buttermilk. Buttermilk also refers to cultured buttermilk, a product where lactic acid bacteria have been added to milk.[1] Whether traditional or cultured, the tartness of buttermilk is due to the presence of acid in the milk. The increased acidity is primarily due to lactic acid, a by-product naturally produced by lactic acid bacteria while fermenting lactose, the primary sugar found in milk. As lactic acid is produced by the bacteria, the pH of the milk decreases and casein, the primary protein in milk, precipitates causing the curdling or clabbering
of milk. This process makes buttermilk thicker than plain milk. While
both traditional and cultured buttermilk contain lactic acid,
traditional buttermilk tends to be thinner whereas cultured buttermilk
is much thicker.
In the early 1900's, cultured buttermilk was labeled artificial buttermilk, to differentiate it from traditional buttermilk, which was also known as natural or ordinary buttermilk.
Acidified buttermilk is a related product that is made by adding a food-grade acid to milk.
 
#5
Hi, Johnny,

Best wishes for your new endeavor! I will definitely come for the pancakes. :)

The best sour cream I've found is Casan Creme (and it comes in Reg and Light).

I've yet to find buttermilk, so I follow a common practice I learned in homemaking class ages ago: for each cup of milk, reduce it by 1 Tablespoon; then add 1 Tablespoon lemon juice to the milk to complete the cup.

And if you want blueberries for those pancakes or muffins, visit our farm any time!;)

Suerte!

Gayla
 
#7
Maikito said:
did you find maple syrup? Do you know where to find pancake mix and maple syrup?
100% Maple syrup is fairly common in the grocery stores. I've seen it in the Discos and Jumbo Palermo (who also owns Disco). Look in the imported food section. I have yet to see pancake mix anywhere.