CFK 24% approval says CNN Latino

YanquiGallego

Registered
CNN Latino has just announced that the latest polls show that CFK has an approval rate of just 24% of all citizens in Argentina.
The lowest it has ever been.
Now, I am just curious, does CNN "tambien miente" ??
 

Matt84

Registered
YanquiGallego said:
CNN Latino has just announced that the latest polls show that CFK has an approval rate of just 24% of all citizens in Argentina.
The lowest it has ever been.
Now, I am just curious, does CNN "tambien miente" ??
Probably as much as Fox News does ;) ....but that's besides the point.

Let's say a quarter of all Argentines disapprove of her:

Does anyone here believe the majority of the remaining 76% would approve or yearn for a Western Liberal government? Not likely,

Does anybody believe that the majority of those who disapprove of her administration, that would be 38% or more, let's say 40% of the citizenship would approve or vote for a Liberal party or rather disapprove of her for not being Socialist or Populistic ENOUGH (remember that in Venezuela, the biggest opposition to Chavez comes from the left, not the right)

If we add the people who'd support Her to the people who disapprove of her for not being anti free market, anti globalization enough, instead of too much, then we're left with a maximum conceivable support for a more Liberal government of no more than 38%.

A new Liberal opposition party could be elected with that number, after all I believe The K Dynasty's first Roy was elected with no more than 40% of the vote in a similarly troubled time. The only precedent in this country would be the Alianza that replaced Menem's 'Neoliberalism' for the chaos that eventually gave the current administration its current powers.

I would be tempted to say that there's hope that at least this kind of Democratic Tyranny (for it is not Totalitarianism) is a step forward after a century of essentially military rule, and that in the future new parties could challenge the system into something more accountable.

But that would be conceding that police and thieves in the streets scaring the nation; instead of the armed forces doing it is a huge step to celebrate akin to the fall of the Wall. 1983 seems more comparable to a much milder Arab spring instead.

Democracy in Argentina does not mean Republican competition for representatives of the peple. It only means that Peronism (and whoever hijacks that 'noble' Fascist copypasta of Franco's Spain) goes unchecked by 'Republican' deranged Armed Forces from which Peronism arose anyway.

Perspective isn't a bad thing, I would encourage South African and Southern African members (even temporary residents who witnessed the change) to allow themselves comparisons.
 

Crema Americana

Registered
She's fallen out of favor with certain groups - or at least certain individuals in those groups who voted for her. :p

There are people that were caught by surprise by the dollar situation and didn't appreciate it (from savers to travelers.) There's others in private education that feel threatened that there is a move to stop subsidizing private schools in poor areas (the act to stop subsidizing substitutes was recalled, but the administration seems to want all schools to be at the same -public- level.) She's had trouble with some of the unions. Poor people will start to look negatively on her when they can no longer buy what they need (I would imagine the figure of 6 pesos a day was an insult to those struggling to keep food on the table.) People on fixed incomes aren't in the best shape either. No need to even mention the business sector - anyone that works with imports or exports.

As things start to get worse, more people will jump off the bandwagon. Only the most devoted will stick with her, but Argentines can get quite demanding when they feel they're being cut short. Her saving grace is that many people truly feel that this is the best administration Argentina has had in a long time... and it might be true, I don't know. She's also done a good job (with history on her side a bit) that North America and Europe are vultures, so the people go along with certain policies (cutting off the nose to spite the face.)

I somewhat agree that there doesn't seem to be anyone fit to run the country... Macri is just as much of a crook as she is, if not more. :rolleyes: It'll be interesting to see who follows her.
 

BienTeVeo

Registered
Eclair said:
Argentines can get quite demanding when they feel they're being cut short.
Hell hath no fury!

Eclair said:
It'll be interesting to see who follows her.
I see three choices:

- FPV continues
- Some sort of opposition alliance of strange bedfellows (Binner, PRO, UCR, PO, etc)
- A faction of the "dissident" peronist crowd (De La Sota, De Narvaez, Felipe Sola)

My hunch is it'll be the third option. 30 years after the end of the dictatorship, this place is still being held hostage to the war within peronism itself. And the general thinking is that no other party is capable of keeping the lid on this place.
 

nicoenarg

Registered
Matt84 said:
Probably as much as Fox News does ;) ....but that's besides the point.

Let's say a quarter of all Argentines disapprove of her:

Does anyone here believe the majority of the remaining 76% would approve or yearn for a Western Liberal government? Not likely,

Does anybody believe that the majority of those who disapprove of her administration, that would be 38% or more, let's say 40% of the citizenship would approve or vote for a Liberal party or rather disapprove of her for not being Socialist or Populistic ENOUGH (remember that in Venezuela, the biggest opposition to Chavez comes from the left, not the right)

If we add the people who'd support Her to the people who disapprove of her for not being anti free market, anti globalization enough, instead of too much, then we're left with a maximum conceivable support for a more Liberal government of no more than 38%.

A new Liberal opposition party could be elected with that number, after all I believe The K Dynasty's first Roy was elected with no more than 40% of the vote in a similarly troubled time. The only precedent in this country would be the Alianza that replaced Menem's 'Neoliberalism' for the chaos that eventually gave the current administration its current powers.

I would be tempted to say that there's hope that at least this kind of Democratic Tyranny (for it is not Totalitarianism) is a step forward after a century of essentially military rule, and that in the future new parties could challenge the system into something more accountable.

But that would be conceding that police and thieves in the streets scaring the nation; instead of the armed forces doing it is a huge step to celebrate akin to the fall of the Wall. 1983 seems more comparable to a much milder Arab spring instead.

Democracy in Argentina does not mean Republican competition for representatives of the peple. It only means that Peronism (and whoever hijacks that 'noble' Fascist copypasta of Franco's Spain) goes unchecked by 'Republican' deranged Armed Forces from which Peronism arose anyway.

Perspective isn't a bad thing, I would encourage South African and Southern African members (even temporary residents who witnessed the change) to allow themselves comparisons.
Argentina is a nation mired in a culture of playing the victim and leader worship. As long as the culture doesn't change, it doesn't matter who replaces who. Fascism is the most supported form of government here. In 2001, the people gathered to tell all the politicians to leave because they weren't happy, 11 years later, they are trying to tell the Ks to leave becaue they are not happy.

Merely replacing politicians is not going to do any good for people here. It actually might do worse. Like it did for the Arabs.

It is the culture that needs to change. And to change that, the education system needs to change. Anyone holding their breath for that? Not me.
 
Top