"Coronavirus: Oxford vaccine triggers immune response"

gracielle

Registered
Aren't certain blood tests already required for marriage licenses - at least in some countries? This would be one more 'safeguard'.
A handful of US states still require blood tests for couples planning to marry. Most do not. Premarital blood tests check for venereal disease or rubella. The tests may also disclose the presence of genetic disorders such as sickle-cell anemia or Tay-Sachs disease.
In this case, I see no relevance in requiring the Covid-19 vaccine.


Bank accounts: if you can't open a bank account you can't transact most business in a country like the US.
Many persons, not just those who are undocumented, function quite well without need of bank accounts. They can cash their payroll checks minus a % at check cashing services. They pay in cash and/or purchase prepaid debit cards which are accepted everywhere.

The point is that a government determined to enforce universal vaccination can do it in various ways..... If a vaccine is seen as the way out, won't governments look for ways to require them? Of course this is speculation but based on everything I'm reading. all hopes are pinned on a vaccine.
True....but the requirement of mandatory vaccination across the board in the US is a stretch. But if made voluntary, those who do not could be required to sign a waiver specifying reason(s) for refusal. That would make them legally responsible for adverse outcome(s) to third parties.

In light of the 1976 vaccine disaster in the US, the vaccines being worked on now need to be carefully tested.
Any vaccine needs to obtain FDA approval first. Can this be safely done quickly? There are protocols that must be met first.
Will people who are informed about the risks be willing to receive such a vaccine? Yes....and sign a consent form.

I hope to travel to SF next June. If by then the vaccine is available there, I will consult with my colleagues to get their opinions.
Personally, I would be less reticent to be vaccinated in the US than in ARG.
 

sergio

Registered
A handful of US states still require blood tests for couples planning to marry. Most do not. Premarital blood tests check for venereal disease or rubella. The tests may also disclose the presence of genetic disorders such as sickle-cell anemia or Tay-Sachs disease.
In this case, I see no relevance in requiring the Covid-19 vaccine.


Bank accounts: if you can't open a bank account you can't transact most business in a country like the US.
Many persons, not just those who are undocumented, function quite well without need of bank accounts. They can cash their payroll checks minus a % at check cashing services. They pay in cash and/or purchase prepaid debit cards which are accepted everywhere.

The point is that a government determined to enforce universal vaccination can do it in various ways..... If a vaccine is seen as the way out, won't governments look for ways to require them? Of course this is speculation but based on everything I'm reading. all hopes are pinned on a vaccine.
True....but the requirement of mandatory vaccination across the board in the US is a stretch. But if made voluntary, those who do not could be required to sign a waiver specifying reason(s) for refusal. That would make them legally responsible for adverse outcome(s) to third parties.

In light of the 1976 vaccine disaster in the US, the vaccines being worked on now need to be carefully tested.
Any vaccine needs to obtain FDA approval first. Can this be safely done quickly? There are protocols that must be met first.
Will people who are informed about the risks be willing to receive such a vaccine? Yes....and sign a consent form.

I hope to travel to SF next June. If by then the vaccine is available there, I will consult with my colleagues to get their opinions.
Personally, I would be less reticent to be vaccinated in the US than in ARG.
If it becomes policy in any country, not just the US, to get vaccinated laws can be passed making it hard to avoid vaccination. Check cashing services in the US could be compelled to conform (it surprises me that with all the Homeland Security regulations it's possible to transfer money without some scrutiny). It will depend on how much authority government is prepared to exert. For people who divide their time between two countries and/or travel a lot, it may be impossible to avoid the vaccination. As I said, all hopes are pinned on a vaccine. It's being written about all the time. I could be wrong but I fear that it may be compulsory unless you're willing to stay home and never travel - if indeed that will be allowed.
 

camberiu

Registered
Article is a bit contradictory, says:

“However, there is no silver bullet at the moment and there might never be.”

"However, public health officials say there is no returning to “normal” until there’s a vaccine."

No contradiction in my view.

1) Things will never return to normal until there is a vaccine.
2) There might never be a vaccine. And even if there is, it might not be 100% effective.

“It’s completely understandable that people want to get on with their lives, but we will not be going back to the old normal,” Tedros said on July 23.


Seems pretty straight forward to me.
 

sergio

Registered
No contradiction in my view.

1) Things will never return to normal until there is a vaccine.
2) There might never be a vaccine. And even if there is, it might not be 100% effective.

“It’s completely understandable that people want to get on with their lives, but we will not be going back to the old normal,” Tedros said on July 23.


Seems pretty straight forward to me.
It's unlikely that a single vaccine will work. There are various strains. Vaccines may be effective only a few months. There are also possible serious adverse effects from vaccines that have not been carefully tested over a long period of time (google US vaccine in 1976). It will be hard to convince everyone to submit to a possibly risky vaccine. Even if there were a well tested and 100% safe vaccine it would take a lot of time to get everyone vaccinated. For these reasons it seems this virus may be around for a long time.
 

gracielle

Registered
https://www.lanacion. com.ar/politica/astrazeneca-empresa-sueco-inglesa-decadas-pais-fabricara-vacuna-nid2419335
12 Agosto 2020...4:48pm
AstraZeneca: the Swedish-English company with decades in Argentina will manufacture the Oxford vaccine here
For the majority of Argentine society, the name AstraZeneca (AZ, in the jargon of the world of laboratories and drugstores) was unknown until this afternoon, despite being an important producer of medicines for daily use for cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, oncological pathologies. and respiratory.

However, the announcement that the vaccine designed by the University of Oxford to combat the SARS-CoV-2 virus will be produced in its plant in the country placed AZ on the front page and in the public eye, for being the first to announce the long-awaited novelty....
 
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gracielle

Registered
12.08.2020 • 19.07hs
Fernández announced that the Oxford vaccine against the coronavirus will be produced in the country: "It is a great relief for the future"
....
"The AstraZeneca laboratory has signed an agreement with the Slim Foundation to produce between 150 and 250 million vaccines destined for all of Latin America, with the exception of Brazil. They will be available for the first half of 2021 ", highlighted Fernández.

The agreement will allow the country and the region to access it between 6 and 12 months earlier than it could have achieved without access to this type of agreement, Fernández explained. According to the president, the cost of the vaccine will be "between US $ 3 and US $ 4 per dose."...

Argentina will be in charge of producing "the active substance," said Fernández, with Mexico finishing "production and packaging." He said that the country "could be in a position to vaccinate" by the first quarter of 2021.
 
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gracielle

Registered
13 August 2020...8:27am
Coronavirus vaccine: Spoke Esteban Corley, director of the mAbxience Argentina laboratory
Argentina will produce the vaccine that the University of Oxford is developing to combat the coronavirus, as announced by President Alberto Fernández. On February 21 mAbxience added a new plant in Garín, province of Buenos Aires, which was inaugurated by Alberto Fernández and Axel Kiciloff. Esteban Corley, director of the mAbxience Argentina laboratory, one of the entities involved, highlighted "the will" of the national authorities for this progress to take place, and projected: "Surely, we will have it, in commercial condition, in the first semester of next year, in January or February". Corley explained that Argentina will not have priority in the distribution of the vaccine. "It is going to be done with very careful priority guidelines because AstraZeneca's intention is to make an equitable distribution in all Latin American countries."....

In dialogue with A24, the virologist estimated that between 20 and 23 million doses per month will be produced in the first stage. "The intention is then to double it and get to 50 million," he said, specifying that, as AstraZeneca's analysis indicates, "there is a primary need for about 250 million doses in the region." The director of mAbxience Argentina said that "in essence" they are "ready to go."
In line with what Ginés Gonzalez García said, those who would have priority to receive the vaccine are those over 60, health workers, security forces and those who are considered "at risk"; that is to say, around 12 million people. "The state would have to take care of the vulnerable."

 
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