Customer service - lack of

on the brink

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Sure, it would perhaps be better for the businesses you contacted if they offered such a service. And again, I certainly agree that customer service here is lacking in a big way.
My point is, in times of need you adjust your business practices to keep customers. Very shortsighted of these merchants not to do so.
 

on the brink

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To elaborate the point:

The shops who so arrogantly dismissed my request sell sewing machines. After this, I doubt I'll be much inclined to shop there. So, they've lost a client. In the States I learned that it is vital to keep one's clients - once they leave, it takes a lot of work to make a new one.

By the same token, I used to buy knitting yarn in a shop nearby. Once I asked for knitting needles, but was told they sold ONLY yarn, and directed to a nearby merceria. In the States, yarn shops sell knitting needles, pattern books, stools to sit on while knitting, magnifying glasses, knitting bags, and anything else remotely connected to knitting. Also, to cover all bases, all kinds of embroidery supplies. Knitters often branch out into embroidery.

A couple of years later, that short-sighted shop went out of business.
 

jblaze5779

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I often wonder how shops stay in business here. Limited selection and poor customer service, but they stay open. I think the locals are much more willing to endure these hardships than foreigners who are used to service.
 

Ries

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I have owned sewing machines for about 50 years now. My wife and I currently own 8. Neither in the USA, nor here, have I known of house calls for repairs. I see this as the Amazon/cellphone way of thinking- everything should come to me, right now.
I recently lugged an 85 pound, 6 needle embroidery machine in to be repaired in the USA- and they did roll a cart out to my car- but no house calls.

I frequently have really great customer service here- free delivery of all kinds of things, prices being rounded down, and I have had several occasions where merchants I frequent give me things for free. The Bolivian verduleria in my neighborhood gave my wife a christmas present a couple of years ago- they were giving keychains with flashlights to all their best customers.

There is more than one type of person in Argentina. Certainly, there are jerks- but also, a lot of very generous people.
 

Mitch

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I have two sewing machines in need of repair - they are heavy, and I can't lug them around. So I phoned three service shops asking for a house call, and all three gleefully informed me that they do NOT make them. Service only in their shop, at their convenience, or none at all. I asked if anyone would condescend to come after business hours - no dice. Then, would any mechanic be interested in a little side business? No way.,,,! Amazing, as one of these shops is six blocks from my home, and another just five minutes away.

That exemplifies the way merchants act in Argentina. First come their personal convenience, and in 35th. place, the customer's needs. Now, I don't think these shops are swamped with customers, what with being January and people watching every penny. Yet, those merchants refused to change their way of doing business, i.e.: customers be damned. It is clear that they've never heard of Darwin - species that don't evolve and adapt will go under. Same for these shops, I'm afraid.

Giving up, I resorted to MercadoLibre where I found an enterprising guy willing to come all the way from Caballito. He's the hope for a new Argentina - may his descendants multiply and people this poor, God-forsaken country......!
A gross exaggeration! In my experience the customer's needs rate no higher than 31st. Pray for more Venezualanos to emigrate, they are the polar opposite as far as attentiveness and customer service. Do you work with the machines? Do you make anything or provide a service we might be able to use?
 

Aztangogirl

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I often wonder how shops stay in business here. Limited selection and poor customer service, but they stay open. I think the locals are much more willing to endure these hardships than foreigners who are used to service.
Exactly. There is an umbrella shop near me. That's it. Umbrellas. How in the world do they make a living?
 

Joglide

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Lots of interesting views here: I have found a huge variety in service, though agree that shop service in BA can be very patchy where not downright poor. There was something of a service revolution in attitudes in Europe in the 1980s, eg when auto industry realised that unless they improved product and after sales service then Far Eastern manufacturers would wipe them out. Similarly, migration patterns without better cultural attitudes helps. I must say I found service a bit uneven though not unfriendly also in Mendoza where poverty seemed high, and in Salta, though again very friendly but not always efficient so 'service' can mean different things I guess. La Plata hotels are often poor service. For me service culture in Uruguay seems better though often cool attitudes. Personally, I quite like authentic personable attitudes rather than the plastic "have a great day!" service stereotypes you can get in Starbucks etc here (Americana talk). In many populist cultures there is resistance to servile deference and people often cannot see that polite efficient service can be a point of pride in one's job or business rather than humiliating oneself. Then again as we have said on this forum, there is not the phoney compulsory "tips" culture you get in the USA whatever the quality of service your receive.
 
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