Do you fear a crash similar to 2001?

Its true that people do not care about Venezuela. Argentina. Yemen or Syria. Life for most people in the west is full of mindless pursuits and distractions and they do mot want their perfect lives to be distracted for more than 2 minutes by anything negative that requires them to think
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Yes, Perry it's quite sad. People in many, many countries (especially the USA) are in their own bubble. It's quite pathetic but many Americans have never even left the USA. Many haven't even left their own state! People in Europe tend to be a little better but they are selfish too and in their own bubble.

I'm not saying people don't have sympathy but other than some quick passing thought they just don't care. It's always the same. Unless someone might have family in that country that personally affects them, they won't lose a bit of sleep over it. Even countries like Greece that are part of the EU. Most of the rest of Europe only cared asking how it would affect them and how it would inconvenience them vs. caring about the people of Greece. I don't think this will ever change.

It's quite sad and pathetic.
 
Now corralito is possible!
It would be interesting to know how you think the new policy of the Banco Central (explained in the link below) could lead to a corraltio.

https://www.centralbanknews.info/2018/10/argentina-launches-new-policy-with-500.html

For those who don't know what an Argentine "corralito" is, here's an explaination in English:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corralito

Do you think the new policy of the Banco Central could lead to a run on banks that will result in frozen accounts (especially those in dollars), or do you forsee a different scenario?
 
Its true that people do not care about Venezuela. Argentina. Yemen or Syria. Life for most people in the west is full of mindless pursuits and distractions and they do not want their perfect lives to be distracted for more than 2 minutes by anything negative that requires them to think
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But I don't see people here any more concerned about Syria and Yemen than people in the States and Europe. About Venezuela, yes, because there are so many Venezuelans here. I do agree, though, that we all need to be less concerned about things that don't matter and more about tragic circumstances like these.
 
But I don't see people here any more concerned about Syria and Yemen than people in the States and Europe. About Venezuela, yes, because there are so many Venezuelans here. I do agree, though, that we all need to be less concerned about things that don't matter and more about tragic circumstances like these.[/QUOTE]

I never said that Argentinian people are more concerned about events that do not concern their lives. People here are no less egostical or more family oriented than the United States. I have never agreed with the argentinian point of view that family is more important here as I see just as many broken families. higher abortion rates than usa. and tremendous conflicts over wills between family members.
 
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It would be interesting to know how you think the new policy of the Banco Central (explained in the link below) could lead to a corraltio.

https://www.centralbanknews.info/2018/10/argentina-launches-new-policy-with-500.html

For those who don't know what an Argentine "corralito" is, here's an explaination in English:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corralito

Do you think the new policy of the Banco Central could lead to a run on banks that will result in frozen accounts (especially those in dollars), or do you forsee a different scenario?
You need money in the banks or in bonds for having a corralito, the new policy focus on creating this conditions.
Later they are going to change them compulsively for other bonds with negative interes rate like they already did defore:
https://es.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plan_Bonex

Nobody has usd in the bank at plazo fijo nowadays that was the target of the confiscation we call Corralito of 2001.