Dog Walkers

victoria

Registered
What does it mean when a dog walker yells at you in a dog park? He had unleashed his dogs and they came over to be petted.

Third day here and ¨No Espanol.¨

Victoria
 

Lucas

Registered
She no comprende man, how the hell would she know.

BTW it's Castellano instead of Espanol (at least here in Argentina)
 

Matt84

Registered
Lucas said:
She no comprende man, how the hell would she know.

BTW it's Castellano instead of Espanol (at least here in Argentina)
She may compare it to New York.... roughly. without the :mad: on the sidewalk.

It's funny to see the shepherd become the sheep, as when you see 2 dozen spoiled golden retrievers being herded around the parks.

To clarify: Dogwalkers yell at them all the dogs to keep avoid losing sight of them, they don't mind that you pet them, but they will call the dogs back.
 

KatharineAnn

Registered
Lucas said:
She no comprende man, how the hell would she know.

BTW it's Castellano instead of Espanol (at least here in Argentina)
Actually both words are understood and used here, so I´m not sure what the point of ¨correcting¨ that is...:confused:

And as a resident linguist here, I´d just like to point out that ¨castellano¨ has nothing to do with the Argentine dialect, but rather is the more ¨correct¨ word for Spanish in Spanish, given that ¨Esañol¨ ignores the fact that there are actually many different languages spoken in España, not just that from the region of Castilla, hence the term castellano. You´ll get many an Argentine telling you that they don´t speak Español, but rather Castellano, but they actually don´t know what they´re talking about :)

Sorry for the off-topic post.
 

Lucas

Registered
If you ever went to school here you will learn castellano (know commonly as Spanish-Español nowadays)

Today, the term "Castilian" is used in other ways too. Sometimes it is used to distinguish the north-central standard of Spanish from regional variations such as Andalusian (used in southern Spain). Sometimes it is used, not altogether accurately, to distinguish the Spanish of Spain from that of Latin America. And sometimes it is used simply as a synonym for Spanish, especially when referring to the "pure" Spanish promulgated by the Royal Spanish Academy (which itself preferred the term castellano in its dictionaries until the 1920s).

In Spain, a person's choice of terms to refer to the language — castellano or español, sometimes can have political implications. In many parts of Latin America, the Spanish language is known routinely as castellano rather than español.

The term (se habla Español) is commonly used to refer the spoken language of a particular country to a foreigner it's at lot less daunting for them to understand that than referring the language as Castellano they will not have a clue were this alien language come from.

Sorry for continuing with this of topic but I need to clear this misunderstanding why here the spoken and written language is called Castellano and not Español, it's the same but at the same time it's not the same.
 

KatharineAnn

Registered
Lucas said:
Sorry for continuing with this of topic but I need to clear this misunderstanding why here the spoken and written language is called Castellano and not Español, it's the same but at the same time it's not the same.
But do you not understand what I just said? Or do you really think no one but foreigners here uses the word español? Of course it is used. Perhaps castellano is used more frequently, but in Argentina, they are synonyms. I just wanted to make it clear that castellano has nothing to do with the dialect of Argentina, which is more appropriately named 'español rioplatense'. I agree that castellano is sometimes used to refer to the dialect spoken in the Castille region of Spain - but I think that's irrelevant here.

I just wanted to point out that it's completely correct, and understood, to say español here...nada mas :)
 
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