Having two passports a help wit entering and reentering Argentina

brandwach

Registered
Hey, I am a US-German Dual Citizen and have both passports. Does anyone else have dual citizenship (excluding one being AR)? And if so, does it make reentering (think perma-tourist) etc easier? Any experiences with dual passports? Thanks, I'd be interested to know.
 

ghost

Registered
No does not. If you enter on the German passport you might be able to avoid the FEE. Maybe.
 

EliA

Registered
Germans are not subjected to the new $130 fee at Ezeiza, so enter as a German, but remember: every time you come and go it needs to be in the SAME passport, otherwise there will be a gap and it will be suspicious and might cause problems (I almost got deported from Bolivia for something similar).

So, get stamped in and once your 90 days is up, get stamped out on that SAME passport. When you come back, if you want, enter as a U.S. citizen (since presumably you won't be entering at Ezeiza you won't be charged the fee). When your 90 days is up, get stamped out as a U.S. citizen, and then back in as a German. And back and forth and so on until it catches up with you, which very well could be never!
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Far be it for me to be a kill-joy, but isn't there a slight possibility the name and date of birth could be cross referenced, thereby thwarting this fee evading frontier crossing fantasy?
 

bradlyhale

Registered
steveinbsas said:
Far be it for me to be a kill-joy, but isn't there a slight possibility the name and date of birth could be cross referenced, thereby thwarting this fee evading frontier crossing fantasy?
Everything is possible. I have a primarily Irish friend, who is also the holder of a passport from Germany and Namibia. She lived for a whole year as a tourist in Brazil, a country that strictly enforces the 180 days-per-year limit for tourists. She never had any problems using different passports to enter. I imagine that if they didn't catch it in Brazil, then they definitely won't in Argentina.

The only thing that I imagine they reference is the passport number...
 

steveinbsas

Registered
bradlyhale said:
Everything is possible. I have a primarily Irish friend, who is also the holder of a passport from Germany and Namibia. She lived for a whole year as a tourist in Brazil, a country that strictly enforces the 180 days-a-year limit for tourists. She never had any problems using different passports to enter. I imagine that if they didn't catch it in Brazil, then they definitely won't in Argentina.

The only thing that I imagine they reference is the passport number...
Oh, of course, I forgot. Nothing works here.
 

bradlyhale

Registered
steveinbsas said:
Oh, of course, I forgot. Nothing works here.
:D Well, this kind of cross-referencing doesn't even happen in the United States. You can be on a general terror watch list and not send up any red flags.

I'm pretty sure Google could do a better job.
 

atwok

Registered
bradlyhale said:
Everything is possible. I have a primarily Irish friend, who is also the holder of a passport from Germany and Namibia. She lived for a whole year as a tourist in Brazil, a country that strictly enforces the 180 days-per-year limit for tourists. She never had any problems using different passports to enter. I imagine that if they didn't catch it in Brazil, then they definitely won't in Argentina.

The only thing that I imagine they reference is the passport number...
no, they reference the name and date of birth. i have dual nationality (UK and Colombia) and have been doing the 'perma-tourist' thing for three years on my UK passport. I recently decided to get legal and apply for a Mercosur Visa using my Colombian passport, so last time i entered the country i did it on the Colombian passport which is brand new. the guy at immigration put my name and date of birth into the computer and immediately asked to see my other passport. he asked why i was now using a different passport and when i explained i was using it to apply for a visa he allowed me through, grudgingly.

my lawyer has told me as well that poeple with dual nationality applying for visas as migraciones regularly get caught out when they check the name and date of birth against thier records.

a big misconception amongst the 'perma-tourist' crowd is that getting a new passport will somehow buy them more time, as there will no longer be a ton of stamps. not true. passport numbers are not looked at. it is all done on name/date of birth
 

steveinbsas

Registered
atwok said:
a big misconception amongst the 'perma-tourist' crowd is that getting a new passport will somehow buy them more time, as there will no longer be a ton of stamps. not true. passport numbers are not looked at. it is all done on name/date of birth


I guess some things do work here, after all.
 
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