Is Argentina Doomed?

fedecc

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and how will these apparent economic challenges affect the people in Argentina and expats?

Applying my experience in other South American countries, I would not that the rich are very very very rich, and thus are likely to be insulated. The masses - would be further challenged (sad, because there burden is already heavy).

Generally, is not poor people that revolt, its the people who dont want to be poor (aka the middle class). It was the middle class that revolted in 2001.

But don't think that something like that is likely to happen now. I do believe however that the economic situation is going to get even tougher over the next few months.

I also dont think the government is going to resingn, but you can never underestimate the insanity of the Ks.

Well, I disagree completely and actually feel this is the perfect time to invest in Argentina. I have a finance background and all I can say is there are always opposite points of view and that is what makes markets. Time will tell.

Sure, every crisis is an opportunity and all but.... you must have some brass balls to invest in Argentina right now.:D
 

Joe

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I agree with LiXueLee that the article is a general opinion not backed up by data.

The vast majority of economic crises occur because of excessive debt. It was debt default that started the last crises in Argentina.

It is the US that is now the one with a gigantic debt problem. Certainly the US has a more "business friendly" environment. However no one knows the final outcome of the debt disaster in the US. Banks are still seriously challenged and there are still millions of mortgage loan resets on the horizon. Although the "depression" talk has died down - that may have been premature.

The debt problem in the US is unprecedented. Argentina does not have this problem.

Probably the greatest economic threat to Argentina is an implosion in the US leading to a dramatic fall in international trade.
 

Rad

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When you say that the problem is the people, it is difficult to back it up with exact data. You can only provide some historical context and anecdotal evidence, which the author did.
 

jp

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Hysterical article full of ugly, ignorant generalisations.

No insights derived from analysis, data or any other intelligent source.

Reads like a race rant trying to pose as a rational argument.
 

Liam3494

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Agree that the article was bereft of fact, heavy on opinion that was one sided, as is his right, but the basis for his conclusions seemed wafer thin. When digging into his detail on the site, turns out he is a Libertarian, and although I do have a good friend who shares those leanings, they tend to generally come from the right of the political spectrum. Maybe Mr Blake is more opinionated against the left in South America, than factually based in his outcomes.
 

Liam3494

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BlahBlah said:
What is left about the era K?

Well, nationalisation - Friendship with Chavez - Off to Honduras on Thursday to support the left wing Zelaya, so I think that the K's lean that way - DO you think differently?
 

Liam3494

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On the other hand, after the elections, they may have nothing left!
 

BlahBlah

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Liam3494 said:
Well, nationalisation - Friendship with Chavez - Off to Honduras on Thursday to support the left wing Zelaya, so I think that the K's lean that way - DO you think differently?

Yes, only in words they are left
 
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