Macri Or Fernandez's Who Will Win Paso

Who Will Win PASO Macri or Fernandez

  • Macri

    Votes: 13 48.1%
  • Fernandez's

    Votes: 14 51.9%

  • Total voters
    27
  • Poll closed .

WST

Registered
I sometimes wonder how many who preach on here would have voted for Macri if they truly struggled to put food on the table for their children at the end of the month.
Yeah, good point. What I would do, if I truly struggled to put food on the table for my children at the end of the month, would be to vote for change. A change that would make that food even less likely to appear on the table.
 

Pensador

Registered
I sometimes wonder how many who preach on here would have voted for Macri if they truly struggled to put food on the table for their children at the end of the month.
Struggling to put food on the table that is their fault. But they are just too ignorant. My father left when we were 6 that was the 1970s. You know how we ate me and brother fishing every day after school. Nothing like looking at a styrofoam box with very little food into at age 7 knowing you can only eat so much. No politician put me in that place and it was my job to get out of it which I did. Life is not about what the government can do you and if you think that you deserve what you get. Life is a fight and you earn what you get out it.

Listening to Argentinians cry about their poverty it is so pathetic it is the excuse for so many of them. I am like sure... you fool! My wife and brother both got free degrees coming from a very poor family. She is an engineer and her brother a doctor in one generation from poverty to prosperity.

Do not buy their sob story it is an excuse for the mentality that they deserve something they DOT NOT!

I am all for human rights and health care but you do not work or have and education and have done nothing with yourself in my thinking you sure have no right to vote. Let those of us that pay for you being a looser do the voting.

Even as a young man in poverty I would have discerned K and rejected her hands down.
 

Stantucker

Registered
Yeah, good point. What I would do, if I truly struggled to put food on the table for my children at the end of the month, would be to vote for change. A change that would make that food even less likely to appear on the table.
That's what we saw happen in Venezuela, populist aid eventually becoming a noose around the neck of the very people it was suppose to help.
 

camberiu

Registered
I sometimes wonder how many who preach on here would have voted for Macri if they truly struggled to put food on the table for their children at the end of the month.
I am no Macri supporter. I was actually one of the few expats in here who expressed strong skepticism when he was first elected.
That being said, he was elected in the first place because things were not going well at all during the previous regime. The dollar restrictions put in place by the previous regime meant that manufacturers in Argentina could not import components or material, hurting the economy and jobs.
Positivo, the largest computer manufacturer in Latin America literally shut down its plans to build in Argentina its largest manufacturing plant ever, due to the dollar restrictions, which made it simply impossible to build in Argentina.
MarcoPolo and Agrale also suspended their manufacturing operations in Argentine during the time because it was impossible to import critical components.
If we go back to that, putting food on the table will be very challenging for most Argentines.
 

Churchill

Newcomer
Struggling to put food on the table that is their fault. But they are just too ignorant. My father left when we were 6 that was the 1970s. You know how we ate me and brother fishing every day after school. Nothing like looking at a styrofoam box with very little food into at age 7 knowing you can only eat so much. No politician put me in that place and it was my job to get out of it which I did. Life is not about what the government can do you and if you think that you deserve what you get. Life is a fight and you earn what you get out it.

Listening to Argentinians cry about their poverty it is so pathetic it is the excuse for so many of them. I am like sure... you fool! My wife and brother both got free degrees coming from a very poor family. She is an engineer and her brother a doctor in one generation from poverty to prosperity.

Do not buy their sob story it is an excuse for the mentality that they deserve something they DOT NOT!

I am all for human rights and health care but you do not work or have and education and have done nothing with yourself in my thinking you sure have no right to vote. Let those of us that pay for you being a looser do the voting.

Even as a young man in poverty I would have discerned K and rejected her hands down.
At best this shows a lack of empathy, at worst sheer nastiness. Look, I personally, through gritted teeth would have voted Macri but demonizing those who voted against him after the shit pie he delivered in the last four years is too harsh.
 

semigoodlookin

Registered
At best this shows a lack of empathy, at worst sheer nastiness. Look, I personally, through gritted teeth would have voted Macri but demonizing those who voted against him after the shit pie he delivered in the last four years is too harsh.
Pensador laid it a little too straight maybe, but there is a strong sense of entitlement amongst voters of the current opposition. However, it's like I pointed out yesterday, it's hard to tell people with no money to wait maybe decades for them to feel the affect of change when they can have free football, cheap beer, and $5 electric bills right now. That's the big problem with any change that Argentina moves through, it requires those at the bottom to suffer the most and many of them after feeling like previous governments supported them (a complete slight of hand of course) simply don't want to make the deal.

They are wrong in my opinion, but it is hard to actually blame them for their mentality.
 

Daniel82

Registered
Pensador laid it a little too straight maybe, but there is a strong sense of entitlement amongst voters of the current opposition. However, it's like I pointed out yesterday, it's hard to tell people with no money to wait maybe decades for them to feel the affect of change when they can have free football, cheap beer, and $5 electric bills right now. That's the big problem with any change that Argentina moves through, it requires those at the bottom to suffer the most and many of them after feeling like previous governments supported them (a complete slight of hand of course) simply don't want to make the deal.

They are wrong in my opinion, but it is hard to actually blame them for their mentality.
Aside from the fact that many Argentinians have grown accustomed, or maybe even spoiled, by the cheap beer, cheap asado, planes sociales, and other government help and are like a kid who’s had its toys taken away for years, there is a strong and genuine population who are desperately struggling to put basic food on the table, pay their basic bills, and even paying the public transportation to come into the city back and forth to work is a struggle, these are people who may have at one time given Macri the benefit of the doubt because they may not have liked CFK’s values at the time and Macri promised a change for the better and future and on paper it sounded good—- But these people have now had it and say they don’t care if Cristina robs, just as long as they can get their basic life back.

A lot of people see her as a Robin Hood of sorts, someone who robs but who also shares what she robs (to some extent, I doubt she will ever be handing out Louis Vuitton purses—- Although Evita Perón was famous for literally showering the masses with money so who knows?)
 

semigoodlookin

Registered
Aside from the fact that many Argentinians have grown accustomed, or maybe even spoiled, by the cheap beer, cheap asado, planes sociales, and other government help and are like a kid who’s had its toys taken away for years, there is a strong and genuine population who are desperately struggling to put basic food on the table, pay their basic bills, and even paying the public transportation to come into the city back and forth to work is a struggle, these are people who may have at one time given Macri the benefit of the doubt because they may not have liked CFK’s values at the time and Macri promised a change for the better and future and on paper it sounded good—- But these people have now had it and say they don’t care if Cristina robs, just as long as they can get their basic life back.

A lot of people see her as a Robin Hood of sorts, someone who robs but who also shares what she robs (to some extent, I doubt she will ever be handing out Louis Vuitton purses—- Although Evita Perón was famous for literally showering the masses with money so who knows?)
You're not wrong, of course, which is why I said change requires the people at the bottom to suffer.

That said, I remember during the CFK presidency that for several years looting of supermarkets was common. Looting shops does not seem like the actions of people with food on the table. People forget that things were hardly cosy here before. When it comes to the economy, the thing I hear more than any other when talking to people across family, friends, or just randoms I encouter is the rise in energy bills, not a lack of food. I am not arguing people are struggling to eat in Argentina, but I am arguing that access to food has not changed that much.

I remember people were struggling to put food on the table under Cristina too and she laughably said they can eat for (I think it was) 7 pesos a day at a time when a single bag of pasta cost nearly three times that. People were starving then too, she just ignored it and lied around it.


Edit to add source. Also, I know that poverty statistics have increased in Argentina, in pure numerical terms there are now more poor people. However, under the CFK Indec was cooking the books and as you can see in the link above, set the bar so low for what a family could live on. In other words, there were more people in poverty during that time than the then government was letting on. Was it as much or more than today? I have no idea.
 
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Daniel82

Registered
I’m telling you: She had/now has some people totally bewitched. She says it, and it could be the most absurd thing in the world, but her admirers are so charmed by her that they will literally eat it up.

A lot of people under CFK lived what most people would deem to be “poor” lives but had access to Fútbol Para Todos, cheap beer and cheap asado, and could buy their sneakers at 48 cuotas and live for the day because tomorrow the government will give you another hand out to get by. To them this was the life of Riley because sadly it’s what many have culturally been raised to care about.

Cristina said it was possible to eat on 7 pesos a day, then when meat started to get pricey she said that she preferred pork because it made her horny and went on to share private TMI about a weekend she and nestor had, and also once said that there was less poverty in Argentina than in Germany and many people actually believed her.

The biggest thing is how she stays so relatable to her voting public when she’s a true narcissist snob, wears pairs of shoes that cost more than what most Argentines would earn in 10 years, and even acts out of touch.. “someone told me my right curl is sticking up... Is it better now? Elegance before everything.” — verbatim expression at a recent campaign event.

Many of these things, like many have said, could ONLY happen in Argentina!
 
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