Penalty for Staying in Argentina Illegaly???

BKK to BA

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esllou said:
I've always wondered what would happen if you turned up at the airport, 2 years into your 3-month tourist visa, and showed them your empty wallet, saying "i'm leaving because I'm stony broke"

what would they do? Throw you in prison? :)
In Thailand the fee for overstay is 500 baht per day (22.00 usd)If you cannot pay the overstay fee they will not let you leave...


Ohhhh those crazy Thais!
 

bradlyhale

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Gonzo said:
Lol!, a lot of people don't seem to take the warnings or fines serious. I'm about to be on the same boat because I don't want to bother with Uruguay again. I'd rather just pay the fine once I leave, but I am wondering if there will be any long-term implications, such as losing the possibility of a future visa or work permit.
I would say that there are if someone inspects your passport. As far as I know, they don't put a stamp in your passport saying that you overstayed your visa. However, the dates of your entry and exit stamps are clearly visible. If someone looks at your entry stamp, sees that you were given 90 days, and stayed for a year, it will be pretty obvious that you overstayed your visa.

Who knows whether such an overstay would be used against you, but it's not something I would risk. I suppose when you have to get a new passport, this wouldn't be an issue with other countries, but possibly just Argentina.
 

elhombresinnombre

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bradlyhale said:
I would say that there are if someone inspects your passport. As far as I know, they don't put a stamp in your passport saying that you overstayed your visa. However, the dates of your entry and exit stamps are clearly visible. If someone looks at your entry stamp, sees that you were given 90 days, and stayed for a year, it will be pretty obvious that you overstayed your visa.

Who knows whether such an overstay would be used against you, but it's not something I would risk. I suppose when you have to get a new passport, this wouldn't be an issue with other countries, but possibly just Argentina.
Remember too that whatever is in your passport(s) is just a smudgy, inky representation of what is held in the computer records of migraciones. That Argentina holds records of visits by name & d-o-b has been discussed on here before.
 

maggiengrace

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Me too please! I´d like to know the long'term implications of overstaying a tourist visa. I just met a french guy who has been here for 4 years and his grand plan is to pay the fine when he leaves. He is absolutely not worried about it. My upbringing has me loath to do something ´wrong´ or ´bad´ but it seems like it´s not such a big deal here? Alternatively, I´ve heard that you can go to immigration and get your visa extended but no word on how/where to do this exactly. Gracias.
 

steveinbsas

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maggiengrace said:
Me too please! I´d like to know the long'term implications of overstaying a tourist visa. I just met a french guy who has been here for 4 years and his grand plan is to pay the fine when he leaves. He is absolutely not worried about it. My upbringing has me loath to do something ´wrong´ or ´bad´ but it seems like it´s not such a big deal here? Alternatively, I´ve heard that you can go to immigration and get your visa extended but no word on how/where to do this exactly. Gracias.

If you had been reading the newcomer's forum posts yesterday or entered "extend tourist visa" in the search engine you would have found this:

how many times can you renew your passport?
 

mcaffa

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Relax everyone - there are no long-term implications. A few years ago I left the country with an expired visa and I simply had to pay a $50 fine at Ezeiza. When I returned to Argentina after my trip, no one in immigrations said a thing. They stamped my passport y listo. A little over a year after that, I was granted permanent residency.
 

Rickyj

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mcaffa, I can't see from your post, when it was posted? I have a related question for all you veterans out there:

While living in Arg on a tourist visa, do you qualify for free state medical and education? It may seem like a stupid question, but I've read the constitution, which states that visitors to Arg are to be treated as equal to citizens - or words to that effect. Anyone?

Also, what's the problem with a quick trip to Montevideo? Is it expensive?
 

Johnno

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Have to admit it - this is a question I would be interested in seeing the answer too as well - although when I come down there permanently I don't intend to take the risk - I will do my visa renewal every 3 months like everyone else - until such time as I can become permanent myself...
 

steveinbsas

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Rickyj said:
mcaffa, I can't see from your post, when it was posted? I have a related question for all you veterans out there:

While living in Arg on a tourist visa, do you qualify for free state medical and education? It may seem like a stupid question, but I've read the constitution, which states that visitors to Arg are to be treated as equal to citizens - or words to that effect. Anyone?

Also, what's the problem with a quick trip to Montevideo? Is it expensive?

Have you visited the public hospital nearest your present residence? I've heard some are decent, especially in the northern suburbs, but others are not so nice. Any Argentine who can afford it has private health care.

What level of education do you expect to receive for "free" here?

Without a resident visa and a DNI you do no have the same rights as an Argentine citizen. With residency and the DNI you do (almost).

You don't need to go to Montevideo, just Colonia, and its cheaper than the $300 peso renewal fee.
 

steveinbsas

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Johnno said:
Have to admit it - this is a question I would be interested in seeing the answer too as well - although when I come down there permanently I don't intend to take the risk - I will do my visa renewal every 3 months like everyone else - until such time as I can become permanent myself...

You can qualify for a permanent visa if you get married to or are the offspring or parent of someone who was born in Argentina. Temporary residents with foreign income and those with work visas are presently being granted permanent residency on the third renewal of their visa, but this is a policy which is subject to change at any time. In 2009 it was suspended for about four months.
 
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