Penalty for Staying in Argentina Illegaly???

Johnno

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Gonzo - this is the one thing I want to know about too :) Long term I will marry my girlfriend in BA and I will get citizenship that way - but in the interim I'll be on a tourist visa and doing most of what you guys seem to be doing :)

I guess this would be my question - is there any sort of 'black list' or would it disadvantage me later on when I am ready to go for citizenship if there was a record of me overstaying a tourist visa or whatever ?

Anyone have any ideas on this ?

Thanks in advance,

John :)
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Johnno said:
Gonzo - this is the one thing I want to know about too :) Long term I will marry my girlfriend in BA and I will get citizenship that way - but in the interim I'll be on a tourist visa and doing most of what you guys seem to be doing :)

I guess this would be my question - is there any sort of 'black list' or would it disadvantage me later on when I am ready to go for citizenship if there was a record of me overstaying a tourist visa or whatever ?

Anyone have any ideas on this ?

Thanks in advance,

John :)
I believe that when you get married you only qualify for permanent residency, though you should be able to apply for citizenship a couple years after that.


I wouldn't be very concerned about migraciones blacklisting you once you are married to an Argentine, even if you overstay you visa and pay fines, etc. Worry more about the relationship lasting long enough to get married.
 

Rickyj

Registered
steveinbsas said:
Have you visited the public hospital nearest your present residence? I've heard some are decent, especially in the northern suburbs, but others are not so nice. Any Argentine who can afford it has private health care.

What level of education do you expect to receive for "free" here?

Without a resident visa and a DNI you do no have the same rights as an Argentine citizen. With residency and the DNI you do (almost).

You don't need to go to Montevideo, just Colonia, and its cheaper than the $300 peso renewal fee.

Steve

Thanks for responding, however, you didn't answer my question. I asked whether one needs residency to qualify for state medical care and education, I wasn't asking about the level thereof. Besides, I don't know where you're from but my experience with many people from the "first world" has been that they don't know their arses from their elbows anyway, despite a so-called "top" education! ;)
 

flyfreely

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I don't know the legal answer to that question. I can tell you though that I have been to a public hospital once and got a doctor to see me without anybody asking me for residency and I am pretty sure I gave them my passport number and identified myself as foreigner although I don't look like one.

One thing I can add to all this discussion about what happens when you overstay is that after many years living here, there is no consistency in the law or in the way they enforce it. I have heard stories of people overstaying here for 2 years without even being asked to pay a peso when they leave. Others that had to pay up to 300 pesos. Others that have been religiously leaving every 3 months for many years and coming back without ever getting into trouble. Others how after only 4 times of doing that get a 30 day stamp and a verbal warning that they won't be let in next time. Others that simply go to another immigration officer after getting a 30 day visa and get a 90 day visa instead. One story I have yet to hear is of somebody being denied entry into Argentina because of previous overstays. I suspect that has simply never happened. If you are in fear of being denied entry to Argentina because of over stays, I suggest you have your embassy's phone number on your cell phone with credit. And if that were to happen, call them up, chances are you will be let out even before your embassy official gets to Ezeiza.

Rickyj said:
Steve

Thanks for responding, however, you didn't answer my question. I asked whether one needs residency to qualify for state medical care and education, I wasn't asking about the level thereof. Besides, I don't know where you're from but my experience with many people from the "first world" has been that they don't know their arses from their elbows anyway, despite a so-called "top" education! ;)
 

SaraSara

Registered
You don't need residency to be treated in public hospitals. The facilities are old and wait times may be long, but they are staffed by well trained physicians, often better than those in private hospitals. The brightest medical school graduates compete fiercely for residencies at the public Hospital de Clinicas.
 

mini

Registered
Health care no one will ask.

As for education at the university level they will ask you for your DNI (as well as official transcripts and the like). It could theoretically be possible to get a university degree for free without being a resident but procedurally it seems to be practically impossible.
 

Rickyj

Registered
mini said:
Health care no one will ask.

As for education at the university level they will ask you for your DNI (as well as official transcripts and the like). It could theoretically be possible to get a university degree for free without being a resident but procedurally it seems to be practically impossible.

Mini

Are you saying that schooling is free to non-residents?
 

mini

Registered
Rickyj said:
Mini

Are you saying that schooling is free to non-residents?
NO! It is not free to non-residents.

What I meant was the theory of all being treated the same that you read in the constitution does not play out on a practical, real life basis. Perhaps when you apply, you can argue that the constitution says you should be treated the same and see if they will waive the fees.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Rickyj said:
Steve

Thanks for responding, however, you didn't answer my question. I asked whether one needs residency to qualify for state medical care and education, I wasn't asking about the level thereof. Besides, I don't know where you're from but my experience with many people from the "first world" has been that they don't know their arses from their elbows anyway, despite a so-called "top" education! ;)

I wasn't clear. As far as I know, anyone can go to any public hospital with a tourist visa (residencia transitoria) and receive treatment without charge, even if their visa has expired. The quality of the treatment may not be very good, however.

Student visas (temporary residency) are certainly granted to foreigners, but I don't know if they are accepted into "public" schools on that basis or can attend a "public" school or university without charge. Perhaps a foreigner who is here with temporary residency has enrolled their kids in the public school system here, but I don't remember any members posting that they have.

I'm almost certain that foreigners with permanent residency would have the same criterion as citizens for public school admission. Children of foreigners with permanent residency would probably be admitted if they also had their DNIs.
 

azure

Registered
Before I had health insurance here I had to go to the ER a few times. I had to wait for hours, and all they would basically do was write a prescription for antibiotics (whereas in the States I would have stayed in the hospital, had an IV, CT scans, etc for the same condition). They just needed my passport number and nothing else, and it was free.

Now I have insurance and while I expect the same kind of treatment from going to a hospital, I can now go see doctors who will actually look at me and give my problems some thought.
 
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