Renting with Pets.

#1
We are considering moving to Buenos Aires soon, probably around September. I'm researching and reading a much as I can. There are many things to consider, but I have an issue that I'm not finding answers to. We will be looking for a furnished apartment for the first two months. Then we will look for a more fixed solution. The issue is we have two very small dogs that will be staying with us. While looking at sites for temp places I don't see any mention of pets at all. Does anyone have an idea about renting with pets in temp or perm housing? TIA, mini
 
#2
Tia,
You may have already checked, but look at www.vrbo.com. I found my apartment through the site and the owners usually list whether pets are ok or not. I just recently moved here with my pet and was able to find a place pretty easily.
Best of luck.
 
#3
Hi Elizabeth, Thank you for the link. I will have a look, but my first impression is that these prices are very high! Most of them seem to be in the $2-5000 range. This is more expensive than Switzerland! But I guess that is a subject for another thread. :eek:/What is your general impression about renting with pets? Is it difficult or common? - mini
 
#5
Hi Bond,Thanks so much. I have seen the ads on Craigs list. Most don't mention either way. I was wondering if it's not specifically mentioned it is usually a no way or if it's not mentioned then pets aren't an issue? What is the general feeling for dogs in BA? I did read about all the dog walkers. But that doesn't mean the landlords like to rent with pets.tia,
Mini
 
#6
VRBO is high priced but appeals to travelers who want to come for a week or two. I rented an apartment in Palermo on craigslist for eight weeks and extended the contract for a total of six months. I was lucky. The apartment was exactly as represented (the owner is from NYC). I know several visitors who rented from locals and the apartments did not measure up to their descriptions. There were issues with noise and furniture that was falling apart. In one case, even the stated location was false (claiming to be in Recoleta when it was not). There also can be issues with the return of the deposit (allegations of damage to the furniture). Of course not all local property owners are dishonest, but lying seems to be a way of life in Argentina. Beware.
Regarding your pet. The only way I can think of to find out if someone will rent to you and your pets is to keep asking. Renting to someone with dogs would provide just one more reason to retain (more of) the deposit (justified or not). Also, be sure to have the CORRECT international certificate of health and be sure it is valid (they expire rather quickly). I arrived form Mexico with my dog and the vet at the airport would not accept the papers I had with me. I was in the country for less than 15 minutes before I paid my first "propina".

Welcome to Argentina.
 
#7
Quoting "steveinbsas": ". . . . not all local property owners are dishonest, but lying seems to be a way of life in Argentina. . . ."
This reminds me of a pithy observation by an American who's lived in the Southern Cone for six decades: that the characteristic besetting sins of Latin America are mendacity and promiscuity.
This hasn't been my experience, but, then, I haven't yet lived in the Cone for even six years.
 
#8
I love the way the threads on this site can assume a life all their
own, straying from the original topic, but often leading to interesting
and useful information. . My purpose here is not to "bash" Argentines,
but newcomers need to know what they are likely to encounter here. It
is a fact that Argentina is considered one of the most fraudulent
countries in the world, and perhaps the leader in the western
hemisphere. I lived in Mexico for five and a half years before moving
to Buenos Aires in 2006. I still consider that move a significant
upgrade.

The strongest point my Argentine girlfriend made when we first
began dating was the caveat "everyone lies". In the two years I've
lived in Buenos Aires I have found that to be true. Even the "most
honest" Argentine I know is constantly warning me to beware of
everyone I do business with. The number one crime in Argentine is
probably tax evasion (black money is everywhere). The number two is
fraud. Both acts are dishonest. Often they go hand in hand.





When the aforementioned lass bought an apartment the real estate agent
did not reveal a number of deficiencies in the apartment. Did she (the
agent) know? Well, at the signing of the papers it was revealed that
she was also the owner!When I started looking for an apartment
to buy I was surprised to discover that virtually every seller wanted
to list the official sale price of the property as much as 30% below
what would be paid, just to avoid the 1.5 percent stamp tax on the
amount not declared. This crime would have to be supported by the
escribano who is supposedly a party to the transaction to make sure
everything is legal. As a foreigner, knowing I was paying more than a
native would, I simply insisted that the full price be declared. They
thought I was an idiot, but my insistence on declaring the full price
was based on what I had learned about the consequences of not fully
complying with the laws regarding transferring money into the country
(something I learned from another expat).



When I started buying furniture for the apartment I was amazed how
often (in the smaller shops) I was asked if I was paying in cash and
would receive a 10% discount if I bought "sin factura" (which is a
crime). The IVA is 21%, so had I accepted the cash discount, the
sellers would have received the full retail price for the item and also
pocketed 11% which was tax due to the government.



Perhaps its only fair that if the consumer gets a discount for tax
evasion that the seller also profits in a similar fashion. Its just
not a game I am willing to play.



While I have found mendacity to be rampant, I would never equate it
with promiscuity (something I have not.yet had the good fortune to
experience in Argentina).
 
#9
I love the way the threads on this site can assume a life all their
own, straying from the original topic, but often leading to interesting
and useful information. . My purpose here is not to "bash" Argentines,
but newcomers need to know what they are likely to encounter here. It
is a fact that Argentina is considered one of the most fraudulent
countries in the world, and perhaps the leader in the western
hemisphere. I lived in Mexico for five and a half years before moving
to Buenos Aires in 2006. I still consider that move a significant
upgrade.

The strongest point my Argentine girlfriend made when we first
began dating was the caveat "everyone lies". In the two years I've
lived in Buenos Aires I have found that to be true. Even the "most
honest" Argentine I know is constantly warning me to beware of
everyone I do business with. The number one crime in Argentine is
probably tax evasion (black money is everywhere). The number two is
fraud. Both acts are dishonest. Often they go hand in hand.





When the aforementioned lass bought an apartment the real estate agent
did not reveal a number of deficiencies in the apartment. Did she (the
agent) know? Well, at the signing of the papers it was revealed that
she was also the owner!When I started looking for an apartment
to buy I was surprised to discover that virtually every seller wanted
to list the official sale price of the property as much as 30% below
what would be paid, just to avoid the 1.5 percent stamp tax on the
amount not declared. This crime would have to be supported by the
escribano who is supposedly a party to the transaction to make sure
everything is legal. As a foreigner, knowing I was paying more than a
native would, I simply insisted that the full price be declared. They
thought I was an idiot, but my insistence on declaring the full price
was based on what I had learned about the consequences of not fully
complying with the laws regarding transferring money into the country
(something I learned from another expat).



When I started buying furniture for the apartment I was amazed how
often (in the smaller shops) I was asked if I was paying in cash and
would receive a 10% discount if I bought "sin factura" (which is a
crime). The IVA is 21%, so had I accepted the cash discount, the
sellers would have received the full retail price for the item and also
pocketed 11% which was tax due to the government.



Perhaps its only fair that if the consumer gets a discount for tax
evasion that the seller also profits in a similar fashion. Its just
not a game I am willing to play.



While I have found mendacity to be rampant, I would never equate it
with promiscuity, something I have not.yet had the good fortune to
experience in Argentina (unless you consider sex on the second date promiscous).
 
#10
I'm certain that many would consider sex on the second date to be promiscuous! But, no, what I took to be my interlocutor's meaning was that many -- most, perhaps -- members of supposedly committed pairs engage in sexual liaisons with others from time to time.
As for the mendacity: yes, I've experienced it, but very seldom. Perhaps I've been spared worse by being looked after by friends and relatives, both in Argentina and in Chile.
Finally, from my little experience of Mexico, I've no question why you consider Argentina to be a great improvement! Yet there are Americans and other foreigners who love the place: may they stay there!