Safer to stay in Lima Perú or come back to Argentina?

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FrankPintor

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Ok he was joking, sorry my bad. You could lay 50 Miraflores end to end and still not get to San Isidro. And the taxi drivers would screw you over and supply you with fake 20 Sole notes in change as a parting shot. We’ve been there, no fooling us.
 

Alby

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I reiterate, after seven years in Lima, alot of time spent in medical clinics recieving medical attention myself, close friendships with doctors at both the highest levels of the Lima elite and at the level of the public system, I can state that medical care in Lima, if you can afford a private clinic (and judging by the rates I am seeing on the other thread, a private policy is more affordable there) is carried out by excellent professionals, in first rate facilities.

The public system, on the other hand, is as poor there as it is here.

The person who started this thread has asked a legitimate question, that is presumably important for him/her. I think, in the circumstances, it would be wise for only people who have serious experience in both systems to be commenting. Very few Argentines who are members of this site are in that position. Their opinions will, in most cases, reflect long out-of-date stereotypes about Peru and Peruvians. They need to get out of Argentina more often, and I am not talking about going to Italy, Spain, or France.
 

nikad

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I reiterate, after seven years in Lima, alot of time spent in medical clinics recieving medical attention myself, close friendships with doctors at both the highest levels of the Lima elite and at the level of the public system, I can state that medical care in Lima, if you can afford a private clinic (and judging by the rates I am seeing on the other thread, a private policy is more affordable there) is carried out by excellent professionals, in first rate facilities.

The public system, on the other hand, is as poor there as it is here.

The person who started this thread has asked a legitimate question, that is presumably important for him/her. I think, in the circumstances, it would be wise for only people who have serious experience in both systems to be commenting. Very few Argentines who are members of this site are in that position. Their opinions will, in most cases, reflect long out-of-date stereotypes about Peru and Peruvians. They need to get out of Argentina more often, and I am not talking about going to Italy, Spain, or France.
Do you have any figures of number of beds, beds in ICU, number of patients per nurse, etc to share and compare?
 

Alby

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According to this report (May 2018), the number of nurses per 10,000 people is 3.8 in Argentina.

According to this report (February 2018) the number of nurses per 10,000 people in Peru is three times higher, at 12.
https://diariocorreo.pe/peru/decana-del-colegio-de-enfermeros-en-el-peru-hay-12-enfermeras-por-cada-10-mil-habitantes-803109/

Both figures are repeated in this report from the Pan American Journal of Public Health

It's just one statistic. There will no doubt be others, that may tip in one's country's favor or the other. And statistics never tell the whole story, as the know.

This thread is about whether the author should stay in Lima, or come to Buenos Aires. He or she needs information about whether or not good medical care is available in Lima. I claim that if he/she can afford to go to a private medical clinic and pay the costs, she/he will find excellent medical professionals and excellent facilities. I know this, I have experienced this. If he or she cannot do so, and has to go to a public hospital, he/she will find equally dedicated staff, but a lack of infrastructure, and inefficient administration, problems that will only worsen as the infection rates increase.
 

nikad

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According to this report (May 2018), the number of nurses per 10,000 people is 3.8 in Argentina.

According to this report (February 2018) the number of nurses per 10,000 people in Peru is three times higher, at 12.
https://diariocorreo.pe/peru/decana-del-colegio-de-enfermeros-en-el-peru-hay-12-enfermeras-por-cada-10-mil-habitantes-803109/

Both figures are repeated in this report from the Pan American Journal of Public Health

It's just one statistic. There will no doubt be others, that may tip in one's country's favor or the other. And statistics never tell the whole story, as the know.

This thread is about whether the author should stay in Lima, or come to Buenos Aires. He or she needs information about whether or not good medical care is available in Lima. I claim that if he/she can afford to go to a private medical clinic and pay the costs, she/he will find excellent medical professionals and excellent facilities. I know this, I have experienced this. If he or she cannot do so, and has to go to a public hospital, he/she will find equally dedicated staff, but a lack of infrastructure, and inefficient administration, problems that will only worsen as the infection rates increase.
If you can afford it there are excellent facilities and doctors in many places, my concern is whethee the health infrastructire is prepared to take acute patients in the middle of pandemics. I guess no country is fully prepared but he should choose the one that could deal efficiently with the largest number of acute cases. In this case it would be important to know whether the OP would fall within the high risk groups as well.
 

Alby

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I agree with all that. S/he needs to be concerned if s/he is in the highest risk group; that applies here, in Lima, and anywhere in the world right now.

(I should add that my comments on the public health system are based, in part on friendship with people who work in it, but also on personal experience of volunteering over quite a number of days in the pneumonia ward of Lima's Hospital de Niño during 2015. I would not like to have to receive attention in the public system, despite the wonderful staff who work in it. I have received attention in the public system here, and it seemed to be on a )

(The first reponse to this thread, and a couple of subsequent ones) contained appallingly racist and ill-informed commentary that is of no help. It is important to be responsible when commenting on this and related threads.)
 

nikad

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I agree with all that. S/he needs to be concerned if s/he is in the highest risk group; that applies here, in Lima, and anywhere in the world right now.

(I should add that my comments on the public health system are based, in part on friendship with people who work in it, but also on personal experience of volunteering over quite a number of days in the pneumonia ward of Lima's Hospital de Niño during 2015. I would not like to have to receive attention in the public system, despite the wonderful staff who work in it. I have received attention in the public system here, and it seemed to be on a )

(The first reponse to this thread, and a couple of subsequent ones) contained appallingly racist and ill-informed commentary that is of no help. It is important to be responsible when commenting on this and related threads.)
I am getting a BA in nursing this year, I know the good and the bad of the public health system having practices at the public hospital system. I m unaware about the size and responsiveness of the health system in Peru. I see a lot of Peruvian health professionals working and studying hete though.
 
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