The Guardian: "Time to challenge Argentina’s white European self-image, black history experts say"

on the brink

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Personally, I have never seen an African negro in Argentina. What the locals call negros de mierda are those with mixed native blood.

Negro (not the mierda) has become synonymous with "villero". Those who live in a villa Miseria are all negros, by definition.

Argentina has a generous open-border policy: all immigrants are welcome, and are automatically entitled to State benefits. They get free schooling, free hospitals, government subsidies, etc. As a result, the country has been flooded by a stream of Peruvians, Bolivians, Chileans, and Paraguayans in search of a better life. Incidentally, Villa 31 is 56% Paraguayan, and the Bajo de Flores villa has become a Peruvian fiefdom. Uruguay,by the way, accepts practically no immigrants.

Perhaps I do move in enlightened circles - must be my good luck. Hope it holds.
 

semigoodlookin

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Personally, I have never seen an African negro in Argentina. What the locals call negros de mierda are those with mixed native blood.

Negro (not the mierda) has become synonymous with "villero". Those who live in a villa Miseria are all negros, by definition.

Perhaps I do move in enlightened circles - must be my good luck. Hope it holds.
Again, this adds to my theory that the majority of posters here never leave a selection of barrios in the center of the city and do not see the real Argentina. You've never heard "Negro de Mierda" or similar and have never seen a black person here. I am not trying to be offensive, I just find that quite amazing.
 

on the brink

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Again, this adds to my theory that the majority of posters here never leave a selection of barrios in the center of the city and do not see the real Argentina. You've never heard "Negro de Mierda" or similar and have never seen a black person here. I am not trying to be offensive, I just find that quite amazing.
Please ready my post again, this time with an open mind: I did not say I "never heard "Negro de Mierda"" - I SAID it's been a long while since I heard it. Perhaps because I socialize with the masses, and they don't refer to each other that way. In fact, my own extended family has two branches which would qualify as "negros" - definitely not European looking. And there's a Negrito among my cousins.

What is the "real Argentina" you refer to? Do, please, enlighten me. I have traveled extensively throughout the interior by train - cattle class, sleeping on wood benches, cheek by jowl with the locals. It does not get more real than that. If you step outside the Buenos Aires area, you'll find that most people are of mixed ancestry. What you might call "negros". Surprise, surprise.....!

And yes, I've never seen an African-Argentinian here, while I've seen many in Uruguay.
 
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Alfred_Arnold

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It's been quite a while since I heard anyone say "negros de mierda". My ancient aunts may do it - they are awesome ladies, firmly entrenched in their 1940s prejudices. But most of us have accepted that a large part of Argentina is peopled by "negros". That includes practically all labor leaders, and most Peronist politicians. The "negros' (de mierda or not) are here to stay - get used to it. Argentina is now a true Latin American country.

Let me add that today, many negros de mierda no longer "live in poor neighborhoods". They now own luxury homes in Puerto Madero, posh gated communities, or in Martinez's most exclusive neighborhoods.

It's a Brave New World.
Yes. this is pretty funny. The "negros de mierda" is pretty alive and well around where i happen to travel. And.......really....the "argentinidad" that you may find appealing and a reason to even be here in the first place is totally lost on these immigrants...wouldn't you say? You don't have to say it in public, but think about it.
 

semigoodlookin

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@on the brink - Apologies I didn't mean to offend you and thanks for your reply. We all move in different circles and I previously wrote a comeback post furthering the debate, but there is actually nothing to debate about. You have one expereince I have another, and that's fine and no reason to go back and forth.
 
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gracielle

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"At first, the ARG gov't had appointed Luis Bellando, a career diplomat, who was quickly rejected because he was a divorced person. Faced with that situation and on the eve of a diplomatic visit by President Fernández to the Vatican, the appointment of Silva was made at the end of January 2020. Her appointment was accepted in early February 2020.

The Pope knew her personally from his years as Archbishop of Buenos Aires. Bergoglio helped Silva and her husband with the Catholic annulment of their marriage, from which a daughter was born, since the latter decided to dedicate himself to the priesthood".
 

gracielle

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When I was a child growing up in CABA in the 50's, porteños would refer to persons born in the provinces in a derogatory manner as "cabecitas negras".
Cabecita Negra: the origin
The first time it was used can be traced back to the 1940s, when, due to economic and labor issues, the first great internal migration of our country began, taking many inhabitants of rural areas to the city of Buenos Aires to work as workers in the new factories that were opened during the industrialization process of Peronism.

For this reason, the term also has a strongly political history: it became popular, used as an offense, during the conflict between Peronists and anti-Peronists in the mid-1940s, attributing the status of “blacks” to the Peronists as opposed to the “whites. ”Anti-Peronists, demonstrating that, in addition to being wrong, at least originally (today we will have to see how it evolved), in addition to being class, anti-Peronism was indisputably racist.
 
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