thinking of moving to argentina

#1
I live in the UK, aged 44 and single (daughter aged 22). I've been considering moving to Argentina for some time but am finding a general lack of advice and information.
I'm not sure I would be entirely happy in BA as I'm not a fan of super-sized cities. The Mendoza area is more appealing, but then again, I've not found out much info about which neighbourhoods outside BA would be suitable too.
I have been taking Spanish lessons for over a year, but I still think I lack the confidence and ability for a full-blown conversation to get by.
As a single woman, will I encounter gender issues regarding finding work and accommodation? What is the best approach to find either? I currently work as an Oracle database programmer and have some web experience too. I am also considering taking a TEFL qualification as a fall-back plan. I would also consider setting up a guesthouse.
regards
Elaine
 

nikad

Registered
#2
"elaineuk" said:
I live in the UK, aged 44 and single (daughter aged 22). I've been considering moving to Argentina for some time but am finding a general lack of advice and information.
I'm not sure I would be entirely happy in BA as I'm not a fan of super-sized cities. The Mendoza area is more appealing, but then again, I've not found out much info about which neighbourhoods outside BA would be suitable too.
I have been taking Spanish lessons for over a year, but I still think I lack the confidence and ability for a full-blown conversation to get by.
As a single woman, will I encounter gender issues regarding finding work and accommodation? What is the best approach to find either? I currently work as an Oracle database programmer and have some web experience too. I am also considering taking a TEFL qualification as a fall-back plan. I would also consider setting up a guesthouse.
regards
Elaine
Hi Elaine!
there are very nice neighbouthoods north out of the city ( Vicente Lopez, SAn Isidro, Olivos, etc ) However, if I was single, and was my first time here I would go for the city, you will feel more accompanied and it will help you get used to the local manners. Working is another issue: unless you decide to go independant and run your own business ( either with local or foreign clients ) it can get difficult, plus you will be paid in pesos and expected to pay almost a touristic rental at the same time. I strongly believe that unless you get paid in euros or us dollars, it can get difficult. Have you ever been to Argentina? Feel free to ask me any questions.V
 
#3
This is a warning to all of you (us) about moving to Argentina, BA or elsewhere for the long term. I'm living here now and have lived here on several other occasions. I've been visiting Argentina since 1973 and have worked here and elsewhere in Latin America and the world. The warning is very simple--it's a great place to live NOW, but over the years it will beat you down if history is to be repeated. And there is no reason why history won't be repeated--hyperinflation, political terror, quickly changing rules and policies. So my dear friends, have a foot outside at all times.

Mike
 
#4
i agree with mike-argentina is great fun now and a pretty cool place to live but what's it going to be like in 5-7 years time when the economy collapses again (and it will happen). Argentina is once again living in Economic Dreamland.
It's cheap here now, life's easy for expats with foreign currency, food's pretty good, nice wine, generally friendly people, quite safe, amazing country to visit outside of BA but...prices will have to go up, the exchange rate will have to come down (probably to around 2-2.3), crime will probably rear its ugly head again and when things start to go wrong the government will start looking for a convenient scape-goat. History has shown that it's always the foreigner's fault.So enjoy it while it lasts because it is bloody good fun; but don't put everything you have (money, hopes and dreams etc) into Argentina as you'll probably end up losing most of it. Like most Argentines do when things go bad. Only they don't have the escape route that you should keep open. I'm leaving in a few weeks after 2 and a half years. I'd actually like to stay longer, at least for another couple of years but an opportunity has arisen in chile so i'm getting out a bit earlier than i expected. I've loved living here and have had a great time but after working and being involved with 'the system' i realised that what you see is *not* what you get with argentina and my initial hopes of a long-term life here were not realistic.
 

nikad

Registered
#5
"buenosairesmike" said:
This is a warning to all of you (us) about moving to Argentina, BA or elsewhere for the long term. I'm living here now and have lived here on several other occasions. I've been visiting Argentina since 1973 and have worked here and elsewhere in Latin America and the world. The warning is very simple--it's a great place to live NOW, but over the years it will beat you down if history is to be repeated. And there is no reason why history won't be repeated--hyperinflation, political terror, quickly changing rules and policies. So my dear friends, have a foot outside at all times.



Mike
All latin american countries have a long history of economical crisis and recoveries, that shouldn´t be anything new to anybody coming here to live on a permanent basis ( unless you really don´t know what you are doing!) If you have the chance to keep bank acounts in your mother country, that is always a good thing to do.

However I believe - unless people come here for the sole purpose of the current exchange rate benefits, or any other speculative activities - that one should get involved and try to change things, just like you would do in your mother country: become a citizen and work for your rights and ideas. I went through many crisis during the past 32 years, it sucks when you have to adjust, it is great and you enjoy it more when you have extra money.

To succeed you have to be prepared, work hard and keep your head up, if you think any different I guess this is not the place to be.

V
 
#6
Elaine,
I agree that getting a job/clients in the UK that you could programme for from Argentina or anywhere else would be ideal. As you would be earning in pounds and spending in pesos (5:1) .... and your income would not be dependent on the local political/economic climate.
Regarding what others have brought up about the country, well yes there are risks involved in investing in this developing country, as there are in most any others... I suppose if one wanted a risk free predictable business atmosphere working one would invest at home? or in another northern hemisphere country?? (Canada? Us? Ireland? )
Most analysts anyhow recommend never to put all one´s eggs in one basket, be where you be...
 
#7
Elaine,
I have lived in the Greater Buenos Aires area on and off for 8 years and have experienced first hand what BAMike is talking about. In hind sight I could have made a tidy sum had I had the foresight during the last ecconomic crisis. Like anything else in life if you are prepared you can weather the storm.
Now regarding your apprehension regarding moving here, by all means give it a shot. Embrace the language, culture and people. As far as your language issues are concerned, there is no better to absorb a new language like immersion. Learning spanish is CRITICAL as you can tend to feel isolated if you have difficulty communicating with your neighbors but I still believe the best way to do that is to live here. I live in San Isidro and have been forced by lack of knowing any other exPats nearby to become proficient in Porteno. This has made my experience of living here much more enjoyable. Good Luck!
 
#8
I have ony been in Buenos Aires for almost 9 months. I did obtain residency and buy an an apartment. I do not live in fear of "political terror". I also lived in Mexico for five years and there I DID fear for my safety...after having "unvited visitors" enter my house twice in the night....
Life is short. In Argentina life is good. I do not fear terrorists detonating a n-device here (though I am mindful of J-18).
 
#9
I have been in Buenos Aires for a while and am planning my escape. I very much dislike living here. I am a happy person, have good friends and a nice social life and money is not the issue. I find Buenos Aires in particular and Argentina in general to be an ugly, charmless, cold place. It is dirty and falling down, the workmanship and pride that people feel in other places I've visited and lived (yes, all over the world including extensively in Mexico) is just not here. I find the city loud, crowded and rude. I hate not being able to buy nice things. Everything is very expensive and is not well made and people here just accept that. The service is terrible, the air is dirty and things are no cheaper according to my UK friends if you live here. Don't come.
If you love tango, latin culture including the men and all their issues and the women and all theirs, if you hate having nice things and are willing to spend a great deal of money to end up living 1/2 the life you had at home, go ahead. Otherwise, stay home. As a learning experience it has been wonderful. I wouldn't undo it, but it has been very hard.

Peace.
 

Fettucini

Active Member
#10
I think whether you enjoy living here depends largely on whether you are a city or country person - I am definitely a country person but now I live in a very peaceful green leafy street in BA so it's ok, whereas before i lived in the center and felt very let down by my expectation for the place in general (have lived here a couple of years now). It can often be perceived in magasines and articles as a quiet, peaceful old European style city with cobbled streets, but at the end of the day it is a big city which can be pretty hectic and noisy just like any third world city in the world.
I do sometimes wonder why i'm running a guesthouse here in this hot noisy city rather than some tropical beach paradise in Brazil though.