Visa Inversionista

Chungus Groyper

Registered
Hey everyone

I spent some time in Argentina a few years ago and have been planning to move since then. While I put that on hold during Covid, I've been waiting for regular tourist visits to open up so I could apply boots on the ground for residency.

I was wondering if the Argentine embassies/consulates abroad are open and accepting visa applications? Particularly the US. Has anyone had luck or are they turning down everyone at the moment? I'm planning on applying as an inversionista. My hunch is that they need people with money coming in and they would approve a visa application if there's a decent sum of money coming in every month, but i know that Argentina really shut down the country and is still keeping tourists out. Thank you in advance
 
Beware! As far as I understand it, (Search previous threads / posts on this sight because there is a lot of information on the topic of inversionista immigration status.) the inversionista visa is frowned upon because you have to disclose a lot about your financial picture from wherever you come from to qualify for the status. And that is like inviting a taxing authority into your living room. Now I am not suggesting you lie or cheat, but you will be very exposed to taxation / confiscation of your hard earned money / value of your assets over time. You really need to think twice before acting at some future point in time. There are other ways to come legally. They might present more challenges, but they won't cut as big of a hole in your wallet.
 

Chungus Groyper

Registered
first of all, inversionista visa requires investment to be done upfront.
Inversionista visa is NOT about sum of money coming in every month.

Rentista visa is about sum of money coming in every month.
Shoot. That's what I meant. I'm looking at the rentista visa. I somewhat considered the inversionista visa but obviously that would require having a good business idea or opportunity, which i don't have. The rentista visa is what I'm planning to apply for
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Shoot. That's what I meant. I'm looking at the rentista visa. I somewhat considered the inversionista visa but obviously that would require having a good business idea or opportunity, which i don't have. The rentista visa is what I'm planning to apply for
Yes, that's the one. However, before you jump through all the hoops to get the visa retintista, I suggest you read more about the tax liability that comes with it, including the bienes personales which is an annual tax on your worldwide assets, in particular, whatever generates your monthly income (which may also be taxable in Argentina).
 
Shoot. That's what I meant. I'm looking at the rentista visa. I somewhat considered the inversionista visa but obviously that would require having a good business idea or opportunity, which i don't have. The rentista visa is what I'm planning to apply for
That changes everything - just a bit!

Although you have sidestepped a major investment in something, provided a business plan etc ... Now you still have to lay a lot of your cards on the table. The disclosure element will still leave you vulnerable to tax liability (like Steven posted). WIth a rentista, you will be demonstrating sufficient / significant assets that allows you to be independent of any employment situation in the country. There are thresholds and the Arg. government will want documentation of how and where your living funds come to you. 99% of the time, the answer is from your collection of assets accumulated over your life. And again (like Steven posted) there is an annual tax on your world wide asserts that will keep whittling away your nest egg.
 

Chungus Groyper

Registered
I appreciate the responses and the warnings about the possible taxes. I have researched tax residency and the rates in Argentina and am aware of what Ill be getting into. Ive read through the dozens of threads on this forum about the various types of visas and people's experiences with all of them. I've been lurking here for well over a year and just now got around to creating an account

I originally made this post in the "entering/exiting argentina" thread, but i believe a mod moved this post into its own thread. I was mainly wondering whether or not the embassies/consulates are open and accepting visa applications? The type of visa was mostly just to provide some background details rather than to be the focus of what I am trying to figure out about the current situation.
 
Have no idea if visa applications are being accepted right now??? But even if they were, Wouldn't think much is going to happen as far as processing them goes. The country is effectively closed off. As in, you can't get in. (Well, actually you can if you meet the following: Citizen / Permanent Resident / Or a close family relationship that can be documented i.e with a marriage or birth certificate etc ... Then if you can meet that requirement, it is just about a lottery situation to qualify as one of the daily 600 who can enter. NUTS huh?) Given all that, my best guess is that there is no activity in your category of interest. A lot of good time in life is being burned doing nothing. A shame.
 

Alby

Registered
Apart from the tax issue, as the world's greatest living authority on the Rentisa residency as it currently operates, I strongly recommend against investing time in even considering it, at least not as a path to permanent residency. The documentation is very difficult to identify (few staff at the migration authority know anything about this category), setting the financial arrangements in a way that they produce the documentation in a way that will work without causing other problems is time-consuming; printing, legalizing and apostilling the documents is time-consuming and costly; bringing the documents to Argentina and translating and uploading them is also time-consuming and costly; and then, once you've done all that, like the dog that chases the truck and actually catches it, when the staff of the migration authority finds themselves in possession of this monster they asked you to create, they realise they don't have a clue what to do with it. Your application just dies.

(On the other hand, if you want to come to Argentina and live almost indefinitely in a legal fashion without having to leave the country every 90 days while they work out what to do with you, it might be worth the upfront investment.

There is no point in working through an embassy by the way. You need to engage an immigration lawyer in Argentina remotely from your home country (such a lawyer will surely advise you not to even bother, but if you insist someone will no doubt be willing to go along for the ride) who you can work with to define the financial structure you need to have in place and the documentation to demonstrate it, which you produce at home and then bring physically into Argentina. You must be physically in the country--e.g., having entered on a 90-day tourist visa--to lodge them and begin the process. )
 
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Apart from the tax issue, as the world's greatest living authority on the Rentisa residency as it currently operates, I strongly recommend against investing time in even considering it, at least not as a path to permanent residency. The documentation is very difficult to identify (few staff at the migration authority know anything about this category), setting the financial arrangements in a way that they produce the documentation in a way that will work without causing other problems is time-consuming; printing, legalizing and apostilling the documents is time-consuming and costly; bringing the documents to Argentina and translating and uploading them is also time-consuming and costly; and then, once you've done all that, like the dog that chases the truck and actually catches it, when the staff of the migration authority finds themselves in possession of this monster they asked you to create, they realise they don't have a clue what to do with it. Your application just dies.

(On the other hand, if you want to come to Argentina and live almost indefinitely in a legal fashion without having to leave the country every 90 days while they work out what to do with you, it might be worth the upfront investment.

There is no point in working through an embassy by the way. You need to engage an immigration lawyer in Argentina remotely from your home country (such a lawyer will surely advise you not to even bother, but if you insist someone will no doubt be willing to go along for the ride) who you can work with to define the financial structure you need to have in place and the documentation to demonstrate it, which you produce at home and then bring physically into Argentina. You must be physically in the country--e.g., having entered on a 90-day tourist visa--to lodge them and begin the process. )
That's great feedback. The best part (there actually were a few.) is to use the services of a competent immigration attorney. They know the system, they know the procedure, and they may take a lot of time off the process for having done things correctly right out of the gate, not to mention knowing so much you would need to stumble upon and learn on your own.
 
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