Why Argentina over other countries?

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

Registered
From the outside looking in (haven't been yet) here is why Argentina fascinates me more than other countries:

1. Architecture/Landscape of the city (BsAs)
2. The food (outside of maybe Mexican food this is my favorite cuisine, plenty of good places in Florida)
3. Soccer/Futbol
4. Nightlife, very active city
5. Cultural similarities (and language)
6. Obviously easier to travel to when prices are cheaper like now compared to some other years in the past
7. European roots- my GF has family from Italy and it's really cool to see how similar the importance of family/friends is in Buenos Aires. I feel like we lack that togetherness in places like the US and UK
MV,

I simply like Argentina, I feel comfortable in Argentina, it feels like home to me.

(I have never had this feeling while in other countries ... and I have been in a few.)

At this point in my life, I am no longer near the area where I was born and grew up. I haven't lived there for a long time. Yet whenever I return to the place of my youth, I am ultra comfortable within moments of arriving, even though I no longer live there.

Well, that is the same feeling I receive when I am in Argentina. In moments, I am home. That feeling to me is special and worth just about any trade off or sacrifice I can make to feel so good and so happy.

I simply don't care what the economy and politics are in Argentina and I don't care what the cost of living is either.

Granted, I don't have to slug it out and work in Argentina, but I think it would all be worth it to me if I had to.

Bottom line, it is a matter of how I feel, not about money.

You are young, life is too short, I urge you to not compromise for anything less than what makes you happy.

There is always a way, there is always a solution. Sometimes you need to work harder, sometimes you need to sacrifice, but never not be happy.
 

Pauletthp

Registered
Yes I would echo the fact the 'Paris' (BA) of S America is got it all around. One outstanding point that stuck out when we lived there was the temperament of the folks. Everyone (rich/poor), and I truly mean everyone, was so engaging. From Sunday festival parades to local shops etc. I never meet a 'jerk attitude' person. Public transportation was crazy awesome as well. We got into bus accident one time and everyone was totally passionate about care/condition. Europe can have some fixed vices on Expats so depends are where you are.
 

Ries

Registered
I have travelled all over the world, and after having been here a week, bought a place. It you like it, you like it. I love the architecture, the art, the music, the history and culture. The melting pot nature of BA is a lot like NYC, but it kind of got preserved in amber in the fifties. The weird economic, political, and geographic isolation meant that a lot of actual physical "stuff" is still here that has long since been thrown away in other places. The mix of european and middle eastern people makes for a very unusual cultural makeup- my close friends include ukrainian, russian, polish, lebanese, turkish, israeli, german, spanish and italian backgrounds, but also gurani, chilean, bolivian, colombian, and other indigenous mixes. I know so many argentines who are incredibly smart, well educated, and, in many cases, world class in their fields, who still wouldnt live anywhere else, even if Iphones were cheaper there.

Its still very reasonable, both financially, and in terms of quality of life- I can walk almost anywhere, at any time of day, without worrying. (NO, I dont hang out in Villas)
I sure dont remember 25 euro milanesas during 2016 thru 2018- it was still much cheaper than Seattle during those years, although, sure, I have seen a liter of Quilmes range in price, at current US exchange rates, from $1.50 to $3.50, but still well under half what a pint of craft beer costs in the USA.
 

bdk1

Registered
I sure dont remember 25 euro milanesas during 2016 thru 2018- it was still much cheaper than Seattle during those years, although, sure, I have seen a liter of Quilmes range in price, at current US exchange rates, from $1.50 to $3.50, but still well under half what a pint of craft beer costs in the USA.
I doubted for a second but then went back to check my messages and yes, here it is, December 23rd, 2017, the €25 milanesa :D (it wasn't minced carrots though, it was the mashed potatoes you see on the side):

WhatsApp Image 2020-10-05 at 21.11.20.jpeg

I also remember not being able to get a decent well-located Airbnb for less than €1,250 around that time, as well as my Argentine friends coming to visit in Europe and thinking everything was dirt cheap.

I agree it may still always have been cheaper than Seattle or a major US city, but it was definitely not cheaper than many European capitals.
 

Mira Vos!

Registered
Many expats come and go according to the exchange rate. They flocked in when it was dirt cheap, and bailed out when it wasn't dirt cheap any longer. Just cheap.
MV,

I simply like Argentina, I feel comfortable in Argentina, it feels like home to me.

(I have never had this feeling while in other countries ... and I have been in a few.)

At this point in my life, I am no longer near the area where I was born and grew up. I haven't lived there for a long time. Yet whenever I return to the place of my youth, I am ultra comfortable within moments of arriving, even though I no longer live there.

Well, that is the same feeling I receive when I am in Argentina. In moments, I am home. That feeling to me is special and worth just about any trade off or sacrifice I can make to feel so good and so happy.

I simply don't care what the economy and politics are in Argentina and I don't care what the cost of living is either.

Granted, I don't have to slug it out and work in Argentina, but I think it would all be worth it to me if I had to.

Bottom line, it is a matter of how I feel, not about money.

You are young, life is too short, I urge you to not compromise for anything less than what makes you happy.

There is always a way, there is always a solution. Sometimes you need to work harder, sometimes you need to sacrifice, but never not be happy.
This was beautiful, thank you for sharing.
 

QuilmesSlo

Registered
Argentina to my mind offers a much more cultured existence than Colombia. Colombia has its own great energy, as well as proximity to the US if you need go back and forth (and easier legal situation in many respects). Both great places -- just different flavors.
 

Ceviche

Registered
MV,

I simply like Argentina, I feel comfortable in Argentina, it feels like home to me.

(I have never had this feeling while in other countries ... and I have been in a few.)

At this point in my life, I am no longer near the area where I was born and grew up. I haven't lived there for a long time. Yet whenever I return to the place of my youth, I am ultra comfortable within moments of arriving, even though I no longer live there.

Well, that is the same feeling I receive when I am in Argentina. In moments, I am home. That feeling to me is special and worth just about any trade off or sacrifice I can make to feel so good and so happy.

I simply don't care what the economy and politics are in Argentina and I don't care what the cost of living is either.

Granted, I don't have to slug it out and work in Argentina, but I think it would all be worth it to me if I had to.

Bottom line, it is a matter of how I feel, not about money.

You are young, life is too short, I urge you to not compromise for anything less than what makes you happy.

There is always a way, there is always a solution. Sometimes you need to work harder, sometimes you need to sacrifice, but never not be happy.
Beautiful words! Resonate with my own sentiments!! Thanks you.
 

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

Registered
This was beautiful, thank you for sharing.
MV,

Well, thanks for that. But beyond beautiful, (Which I wasn't shooting for in my post, it just worked out that way.) I wanted to be honest and truthful.

I don't care who a person is, what their back ground is, or how much money they have, we are all the same. Each of us only has 24 hours in a day. It all comes down to how each person decides to use their time.

Some people use their time wisely, others waste it / throw it away. Some people are highly productive and others are lazy. Truthfully, I have done a little of each over my lifetime. And thankfully, I have recognized for myself what I am trying to share with you right now, before it became too late for me. (MEANING >>> I am still young enough not to live in regret. I still have plenty of time on my side to correct my faults and get on the correct path.)

Anyway, my advice is simple, try to live in a balanced manner. A little of everything (or a balance between what you enjoy) instead of too much of one or a few things. If you aspire to this way of living, I can almost guarantee you that you won't have many regrets later on in your life.

Each and every moment, time is ticking away. You really don't hear it so loudly at your point in life. Women hear it when they come up against their reproductive years melting away. Men hear it when they are old enough to be the father of the women they chase.

If you want to try Argentina, try Argentina. It may be the very best thing you ever did, it could also be a failure. But try it, so you don't regret not having tried it. Know this: I think you are placing too much faith in the opinions of others here. They are not you. You are you and you know what you seek!
 

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

Registered
Argentina to my mind offers a much more cultured existence than Colombia. Colombia has its own great energy, as well as proximity to the US if you need go back and forth (and easier legal situation in many respects). Both great places -- just different flavors.
Columbia is a Ford GT40.

Argentina is a La Ferrari.

They are both awesome exotic sports cars ... The GT 40 can perform ... The Ferrari awakens passion ... it has the power of mystique.

That is the difference between the two countries in my view.
 
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