Why is coffee so bad in BA?

Precisely. The so-called torrefacto. Basically ruins the coffee beans. Here's a nice article explaining this post-war toasting process which many places still employ.
Interesting article: I didn't know the history before. Given that wartime conditions no longer exist and German ersatz coffee and the like are now things of the past, these days if people drink cafe torrado con azucar it is probably because they prefer it that way. As far as I'm aware the main brands that offer such caramelised coffee also offer regular ground and roast products too so the choice not to drink it is there. If one's local supermarket doesn't stock the regular version it probably means most of ones neighbours prefer it the other way.

It's a matter of personal choice in the same way that some people in the United States buy a perfectly good cup of coffee and then put a shot of vanilla into it. (Mind you, if people buy their coffee in an American gas station, the addition of the vanilla is completely understandable.)
 

Fiscal

Registered
Starbucks is perfectly fine and much better than the average cafe, especially in terms of customer service. There's a reason Starbucks have long lines.
 

Idois

Registered
It's a matter of personal choice in the same way that some people in the United States buy a perfectly good cup of coffee and then put a shot of vanilla into it. (Mind you, if people buy their coffee in an American gas station, the addition of the vanilla is completely understandable.)
Good example of personal preference. Condensed milk in coffee is another example. I remember trying in Vietnam coffee with raw egg in it, so why not.

... these days if people drink cafe torrado con azucar it is probably because they prefer it that way....
I'd say it is because they have not been exposed to (or chose not to consume) the alternative.

We humans are creatures of habit and we tend to avoid (even reject) questioning things we learned at some point in the past, especially if this learning was passed on to us by our caregivers or other individuals who serve as our reference points. We do this even if these learned preferences are not healthy for us. Most coffee consumers can't tell the difference among coffee bean types, origin, acidity, etc. It's not because they are ignorant, but rather they may not care, or may not have been exposed to the really good one. Reminds me of that saying "Once you go black, you never go back". Same thing with good coffee beans. ;-)
 

Mitch

Active Member
Interesting article: I didn't know the history before. Given that wartime conditions no longer exist and German ersatz coffee and the like are now things of the past, these days if people drink cafe torrado con azucar it is probably because they prefer it that way. As far as I'm aware the main brands that offer such caramelised coffee also offer regular ground and roast products too so the choice not to drink it is there. If one's local supermarket doesn't stock the regular version it probably means most of ones neighbours prefer it the other way.

It's a matter of personal choice in the same way that some people in the United States buy a perfectly good cup of coffee and then put a shot of vanilla into it. (Mind you, if people buy their coffee in an American gas station, the addition of the vanilla is completely understandable.)
Excellent link, thanks. Up to 20% sugar in the bean, wow! Vanilla is a big word. I'd love to know the makeup of that additive in most places. On second thought maybe I wouldn't.
 

sts7049

Registered
i love me some chicory coffee, the smells are amazing.

great link though, that probably explains a lot about most cafes in BA. which is why i stick to a handful of specialty shops or starbucks for its consistency (or my own beans i bring from the US if at home)
 

lunar

Registered
Starbucks is perfectly fine and much better than the average cafe, especially in terms of customer service. There's a reason Starbucks have long lines.
I don't quite understand people's fascination with Starbucks. I think it is rather an emotional attachment that doesn't have any rational basis behind it.

If you need to decide between Starbucks and a gas station, Starbucks undoubtedly wins. But in comparison with the local coffee chains? Let's take Martinez, for example. What would be a Starbucks' equivalent of a regular black coffee in Martinez? An Americano in a paper cup? Please explain me, in what way is it better?
 

MatameBA

Newcomer
I don't quite understand people's fascination with Starbucks. I think it is rather an emotional attachment that doesn't have any rational basis behind it.

If you need to decide between Starbucks and a gas station, Starbucks undoubtedly wins. But in comparison with the local coffee chains? Let's take Martinez, for example. What would be a Starbucks' equivalent of a regular black coffee in Martinez? An Americano in a paper cup? Please explain me, in what way is it better?
Locals love Starbucks because of the brand name/marketing, the comfortable chairs/couches, and the sugary drinks like the dulce de leche latte. TONS of people order those 1000+ calorie drinks. Starbucks doesn't need to have good coffee because I'd wager less than 10% of customers order straight coffee. Argentines also tend to put a lot of sugar in their coffee anyways, so quality is less important.

It all comes down to personal taste, but in my opinion Starbucks is no better or worse than the big Argentine coffee chains. Cafe Martinez, Havanna and Starbucks are all mediocre. It just depends which brand of mediocrity you prefer. Starbucks is just more expensive because of the brand name and yankee fame.

Oh, and Starbucks will serve you coffee in a normal ceramic cup. You just have to ask for it.
 
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