Working in Argentina

SilverStar

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being married to an Argentine, you should have no problem getting permanent residency, but only after you have lived in Argentina for a while. Getting a CDI is very easy as well.
I have been though the process, as I'm married to an Argentine. ARCA is a great firm that helps with these issues, and I've heard getting a lawer is not too expensive and makes the process faster and easier. Good Luck!
Fred
 

lwfh

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Hi,

If you got married outside Argentina, all you need to do to get a permanent visa is to go to the Argentine Consulate in your home country and they should tell you the documents that you need and once you submit them it then just takes a couple of days.

After you arrive in Argentina you then take your documents (and the documents given to you by the Argentine consulate in your home country) to ReNaPer on 25 Mayo to apply for your DNI.

But, you can get a CUIL (a social security number) and therefore work, without a DNI - all you need is a passport and evidence of your residency status (i.e. your visa stamp) - and take them to any ANSES office (they are called UDAI) e.g. there is one on 9 de Julio. If you wait until after you get your DNI then your CUIL and DNI will have the same number, but this isn't necessary.

Other people have told you the documents that you will need.

HTH
 

dageeza

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WOW - I did not expect such quick, informative and concise replies - thank you to everyone !!

OK this is the situation as I understand it. BTW I couldn't remember the term for verified - yes I have the following apostillized :-

Copy of passport
Copy of Police character report

These were done in Ireland

Copy of birth cert - this was done in UK

I was married in Buenos Aires

I am a Senior Windows technician, specializing in Windows 2003, Exchange 2003 and other back office technologies. If anyone has an offer to make I will gladly mail them my CV !! I agree that the reason I cannot get sponsored by a company there is the proliferation of resident IT specialists - although this has not stopped companies from being interested if I was already there.

So my understanding is as follows :-

I cannot get a job there without either permanent VISA or a CUIL. I should be able to apply for the former at the Embassy here in Dublin, the latter I have to apply in Argentina. If I get the VISA, I do not need the DNI, BUT I should be able to apply and get one easily enough over there due to marital status. Residency is unnecessary if I have the VISA, CUIL and/or DNI, but again, I can apply for that over there and will have to live 2 years to qualify.

So number one is to check the link kindly provided and start application for VISA. I think I have all the right documents apostillized.

OK If someone can confirm above, I will get started.

Thanks once again to all.

I will try to actively contribute to the success of this site.
 

elhombresinnombre

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dageeza said:
So number one is to check the link kindly provided and start application for VISA. I think I have all the right documents apostillized.

OK If someone can confirm above, I will get started.

I think that it's simpler than you (and others) are making it - but I'm sure the group will correct me if I am wrong.


Essentially, being married to an Argentine trumps all other reasons for gaining residency so forget about work permits and such and just apply, through the embassy, for permanent residence as the spouse of an Argentine. It will take an interview, a few forms and payment of a fee. Once you have permanent residence you are entitled to live there and work there. True, once you are there you will spend hours and days and weeks making appointments and queuing for the other essential bits you will need but that's just the Argentine way, so get used to it.


Aside from the tourists, I believe most of the non-Argentine people who are posting to this group were originally allowed to stay in Argentina because they were retirees, investors, workers or because they had independent means. These people have a much tougher time getting their documentation in order and keeping it that way than you will have and new regulations now coming into force are making it even more so. But this should not affect you. I suspect that most ex-pats who are married to Argentines actually first came to stay in the country on one of those other visas and married afterwards. That's why they can offer first-hand experience of all the complications and bureacracy they have had to wade through. What would be really helpful would be to hear the experiences of some of those who, like you, married first and then came along afterwards to stay in Argentina.
 

mini

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dageeza said:
I am a Senior Windows technician, specializing in Windows 2003, Exchange 2003 and other back office technologies. If anyone has an offer to make I will gladly mail them my CV !! I agree that the reason I cannot get sponsored by a company there is the proliferation of resident IT specialists - although this has not stopped companies from being interested if I was already there.
You do not NEED any company to sponsor you. You will get permanent residency becuase you are married to an Argentine. Thus you can get a job the regular way with no restrictions.

I can't help you with the job. The company I know is looking for other types. But I'll keep my ears open.

[/quote]
So my understanding is as follows :-

I cannot get a job there without either permanent VISA or a CUIL. I should be able to apply for the former at the Embassy here in Dublin, the latter I have to apply in Argentina. If I get the VISA, I do not need the DNI, BUT I should be able to apply and get one easily enough over there due to marital status. Residency is unnecessary if I have the VISA, CUIL and/or DNI, but again, I can apply for that over there and will have to live 2 years to qualify.

So number one is to check the link kindly provided and start application for VISA. I think I have all the right documents apostillized.
You will apply for & get the DNI as well eventually. Generally, you will need this to work. But currently they are taking a long time to process the DNIs. I don't know if you can 'cut to the front of the line' and get one faster since you are married to an Argentine & getting perm residency right away.

Assuming you can't jump the queue, while you wait for the DNI, you can get another number, a CUIL, which will also allow you to work. This takes about 2-3 weeks to process. Once you have either of the two numbers you can start working.

Usually you get the DNI first, but if the DNIs are backed up you can get the CUIL first. You will have both at one point or another.

Hope that is a bit clearer....

(As someone else brought up the citizenship thing I'll add that once you have lived as a permanent resident for two years you can apply for citizenship, unless this has changed recently.)
 

thebookcellar

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hey,
i am also married to an argentine and actually within the process of my residency i just want to make a quick comment:

elhombresinnombre has the best and simplest advice.

I applied for my residency (with all the paperwork) and recieved the RESIDENCIA DE PRECARIA piece of paper. With that, the same day i went to ANSES (with more paperwork) and got my CUIL.

I saw someone say "i dont remember the difference between CUIL/CUIT" - CUIL is for every worker - if you are self-employed/have a business it becomes a CUIT.

I then went to work.

The res, the DNI, the permenant residency all takes time. The only thing you need to put money in your pocket is the RESIDENCY DE PRECARIA and your CUIL.

As all said - being married makes it automatic. For me what complicated things were items on record for my 'mis-spent youth'. I am not being denied my residency. Im just being shown new bureaucratic avenues.

danielzachariah@hotmail.com

Email if you need anything - i am regularly in any one of the offices mentioned in this thread... it forms part of my diary! (and my mum is from cork)
 

djlinse37

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I married an Argentine while in the US. We had a child there. Before moving to BA, we (my daughter and I) applied for and received permanent residency through the Embajada in Washington, DC. (We lived just a few blocks away which made it easier.) They required all of the things listed in various places here (all translated/apostilled). It didn't take that long after we had everything. Took about an hour or so finally at the Embajada to fill the final forms, take fingerprints, stamp the permanent visa in our passports, etc. and then they gave us two sealed envelopes each (sort of mysterious!). The first was to be left at immigration at the airport (which it was, I believe this made its way to Migraciones eventually). The second was to be handed to Registro when we applied for our DNI. When we went to Registro, the woman opened them both (my daughter's and mine) up, pulled out the papers, and said (in Spanish and in classic Argentine style), "let's see what you're missing!". She sent us back for the official local translations and stamp by the translation office. She said we didn't need the marriage license, which I interpreted to mean for a DNI, it is only needed for permanent residency. And we also had to got to Migraciones and get our residency certified (Certificado de Residencia), which is essentially Argentina saying that their own Embassy stamped our passports correctly(!). (*)

Once I had the Certificado de Residencia, I went to ANSES to get a CUIL. They rejected me, since I didn't have a DNI. I had a lawyer with me arguing up the chain to what was supposed to be the head of that office that there was no reason that I had to have a DNI to get a CUIL. In the end, it was easier to just have the DNI in process, i.e. essentially got my appointment, and then went back to ANSES and got my DNI in a matter of about 5 minutes.

Soon after, since I wanted to register as a self-employed taxpayer (monotributista) to do consulting work locally, I went to AFIP and registered there quite easily for my CUIT (US equivalent: Employer Identification Number), 30 minutes in and out, although I had an accountant do the initial computer setup after getting the login information from AFIP, as it is confusing unless your spanish is *very* good.

Both the CUIL and the CUIT, without a DNI, have the same generated number that looks like a DNI number. Once you get your real DNI, you're to go back to ANSES (with photocopies!) and get that number put on your CUIL.

This all was just *my* experience of course. Others have had different ones. I believe that conversations during this process indicated that it *might* have been easier to get the CUIL if I hadn't received my permanent residency before arriving. I don't necessarily see/know how, but that might explain some of the differences. Or it might not!

Dennis

(*) Longer story for me was that we weren't too impressed by the Embajada in Washington, and they ended up costing me lots of headaches as the didn't put us in the computer like they were supposed to, so I had to go to the Cancilleria (equivalent to US State Department who is in charge of all Argentine embajadas around the world) who "kicked" the embajada in Washington into putting our information into the computer, but then the put my entrance date in wrong (on purpose?), so it didn't match the date on my passport. And that date entered into the computer "cannot" be changed by anyone, so I now have a stamped letter from the Cancilleria that says that the date in the computer is wrong and that the date on my passport is correct... This whole process took about 3 trips each to Migraciones and the Cancilleria. Luckily for me, we live near Retiro, so I could walk to both places. The Cancilleria is the modern glass building across Esmeralda from the old Cancilleria, which is the Palacio San Martin, the very beautiful palace adjacent to Plaza San Martin on Arenales Y Esmeralda facing Av. Sante Fe.
 

mini

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djlinse37 said:
Once I had the Certificado de Residencia, I went to ANSES to get a CUIL. They rejected me, since I didn't have a DNI. I had a lawyer with me arguing up the chain to what was supposed to be the head of that office that there was no reason that I had to have a DNI to get a CUIL. In the end, it was easier to just have the DNI in process, i.e. essentially got my appointment, and then went back to ANSES and got my DNI in a matter of about 5 minutes.

You got your DNI in 5 minutes? Was this recently? I'd be curious to know if this is still the case or if even perm residents have to wait (forever!) for the DNI.
 

steveinbsas

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Perhaps djlinse37 meant he got his CUIL at ANSES in five minutes. As you know, ANSES doesn't issue DNI's.
 

djlinse37

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mini said:
You got your DNI in 5 minutes? Was this recently? I'd be curious to know if this is still the case or if even perm residents have to wait (forever!) for the DNI.

Ooops!!!! Acronym slip! Very sorry! I got my *CUIL* at ANSES in 5 minutes, after having all of the correct paperwork plus that DNI paperwork (but no DNI).

Leaving out lots of steps, return visits, etc.:

Migraciones --> Certificado de Residencia
Registro --> DNI appointment
ANSES --> CUIL
AFIP --> CUIT
Registro --> DNI

The first four steps where done in Oct/Nov last year. The last is obviously much later. We moved here in September.

I have not heard any other reference to the Certificado de Residenia in this forum. Has anyone else needed this step?

And a note for other Argentines (or XXX/Argentine couples) returning: If you've lived out of Argentina for more than a year (I think that is the right length) and you're moving back, the Argentine can get a "Certificado de Residencia" from the Embajada/Consulate in whatever country you are moving from certifying that you've been living there for long enough. What this give you is a tax/duty-free move back to Argentina for most of your possessions (except cars). You can only do this once every three years. Of course, knowledgeable moving companies will know this too.

Dennis

PS: The other minor step that I had to do (actually first), was to have someone at Migraciones confirm my passport entry stamp as the imprint of the date of entry when I arrived at EZE was almost unreadable. The lawyer said that I should get this done first, to prevent further questions down the line. This was a no-cost/no-wait line, all of the way at the back of the big second room.
 
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