Advantages of being citizen vs resident?

ben

Active Member
#31
I am not sure that a non-lawyer can threaten sanctions against a clerk, but you can definitely set that clerk straight.
The law in question is Ley 23.059, which restored the pre-dictatorship citizenship law. The reglamento of that law, Decreto N° 3.213/1984, specifies the following:

Art. 3° — Los extranjeros designados en el artículo 2° inciso 1° de la Ley N° 346, al tiempo de solicitar su naturalización deberán cumplimentar las siguientes condiciones:​
a) tener dieciocho (18) años de edad cumplidos​
b) residir en la República dos (2) años continuos​
c) manifestar ante los jueces federales su voluntad de serlo.​
That is where the 2 year requirement is spelled out. The subsequent subclauses detail when that requirement is waived (emphasis mine):

También podrán obtener la naturalización cualquiera sea el tiempo de su residencia los extranjeros que acrediten las siguientes circunstancias:​
a) haber desempeñado con honradez empleos en la Administración Pública Nacional, Provincial o Municipal o en el Territorio Nacional de la Tierra del Fuego, Antártida e Islas del Atlántico Sud, dentro o fuera de la República.​
b) haber servido en las Fuerzas Armadas Argentinas o haber asistido a una acción de guerra en defensa de la Nación.​
c) haber establecido en el país una nueva industria, introducido una invención útil o realizado cualquier otra acción, que signifique un adelanto moral o material para la República.​
d) hallarse formando parte de las colonias establecidas o que se establecieren en cualquier punto del país.​
e) habitar o promover el poblamiento del Territorio Nacional de la Tierra del Fuego, Antártida e Islas del Atlántico Sud.​
f) tener cónyuge o hijo argentino nativo.
g) ejercer la docencia en cualquiera de sus ramas.​

In short, you are not subject to the 2-year residency requirement if you: worked for any level of government; served in the armed forces; have introduced a new industry to the country; form part of the colonies established in the country(?); live or help populate specific territories; have a native Argentine spouse or child; teach just about anywhere.

You tell the clerk he/she is violating the law, and cite chapter and verse, they tend to yield pretty fast.
P.S. Probably not much legal education necessary to ensure the clerk is aware of the following excerpt of the Codigo Penal de la Nación:

Capítulo IV​
Abuso de autoridad y violación de los deberes de los funcionarios públicos​
ARTICULO 248. - Será reprimido con prisión de un mes a dos años e inhabilitación especial por doble tiempo, el funcionario público que dictare resoluciones u órdenes contrarias a las constituciones o leyes nacionales o provinciales o ejecutare las órdenes o resoluciones de esta clase existentes o no ejecutare las leyes cuyo cumplimiento le incumbiere.​
Having advised the clerk of the relevant law, should suffice to tell the clerk “you understand that if I need to hire a lawyer to make sure you follow the law, I will open a causa against you for abuso de autoridad.”

I highly doubt the clerk will continue to go rogue.
 
#32
P.S. Probably not much legal education necessary to ensure the clerk is aware of the following excerpt of the Codigo Penal de la Nación:

Capítulo IV​
Abuso de autoridad y violación de los deberes de los funcionarios públicos​

ARTICULO 248. - Será reprimido con prisión de un mes a dos años e inhabilitación especial por doble tiempo, el funcionario público que dictare resoluciones u órdenes contrarias a las constituciones o leyes nacionales o provinciales o ejecutare las órdenes o resoluciones de esta clase existentes o no ejecutare las leyes cuyo cumplimiento le incumbiere.​
Having advised the clerk of the relevant law, should suffice to tell the clerk “you understand that if I need to hire a lawyer to make sure you follow the law, I will open a causa against you for abuso de autoridad.”

I highly doubt the clerk will continue to go rogue.
Jajajajaja. If you say that you are the one who is going to be under criminal prosecution (art. 237 CP).
 
#33
Stan's question:



was posting inside the quote:



Based on posts I've read in the forum (most by that "citizenship lawyer"), more judges than ever are requiring two years of uninterrupted physical presence in Argentina and that it is still possible (with legal representation) to obtain citizenship without temporary residency or the DNI.

It doesn't appear to make much difference if the residency is temporary or permanent, but the best way to get a "quick" answer is to go to the federal court that has jurisdiction over your domicile and ask for a list of the requirements.
DNU 70/2017 does not make any difference.
 
#34
Para solicitar la ciudadanía argentina no es necesario contar con un abogado ni gestor.
https://www.argentina.gob.ar/obtener-la-ciudadania-argentina#2
All the information in that link is wrong.
The uninterrupted residency has been abolished since 1956.
You do not need DNI neither birth certificate or local background certificates.
The DNM certificate was a requirement until 1984 since 1979.
Legal residency is neither a legal requirement.
 
#35
P.S. Probably not much legal education necessary to ensure the clerk is aware of the following excerpt of the Codigo Penal de la Nación:

Capítulo IV​
Abuso de autoridad y violación de los deberes de los funcionarios públicos​

ARTICULO 248. - Será reprimido con prisión de un mes a dos años e inhabilitación especial por doble tiempo, el funcionario público que dictare resoluciones u órdenes contrarias a las constituciones o leyes nacionales o provinciales o ejecutare las órdenes o resoluciones de esta clase existentes o no ejecutare las leyes cuyo cumplimiento le incumbiere.​
Having advised the clerk of the relevant law, should suffice to tell the clerk “you understand that if I need to hire a lawyer to make sure you follow the law, I will open a causa against you for abuso de autoridad.”

I highly doubt the clerk will continue to go rogue.
It is not about legal education, it is all about nazism. The abolished Law 21.795 was german citizenship right of the II and III Reich, particulary the Nuremberg’s racial laws.

I give you an example. It was quoted the case of that person in Mendoza with argentine spounce, remember? The employed at Court asked anyway for the 2 years. You know why? Because the source of the cause of marriage comes from old Hebrew righ.
 
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#38
It is not about legal education, it is all about nazism. The abolished Law 21.795 was german citizenship right of the II and III Reich, particulary the Nuremberg’s racial laws.

I give you an example. It was quoted the case of that person in Mendoza with argentine spounce, remember? The employed at Court asked anyway for the 2 years. You know why? Because the source of the cause of marriage comes from old Hebrew righ.
The case of "that person in Mendoza with argentine spounce" is the one we're talking about here and Ben is not the one who would be facing prosecution (as you indicated) for telling the clerk. "(Y)ou understand that if I need to hire a lawyer to make sure you follow the law, I will open a causa against you for abuso de autoridad."

He advised "that person in Mendoza" to do so.

PS: Fortunately, "that person in Mendoza" is unlikely to read it as it wasn't posted in the original (and relevant) thread. if he reads it in this one, hopefully, he'll know better than to follow Ben's advice, assuming that you (BC2) are correct..
 
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