Argentina suspends beef exports for 30 days

elhombresinnombre

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It is amazing the way the government is able to repeatedly hobble its few competitive sectors. You just have to shake your head sometimes.
I find that the Saturday "Campo" insert to La Nacion often reveals the real issues behind current food and farming stories that are just skimmed over by general reporting. I wouldn't be surprised if tomorrow's edition discusses this matter in some detail but I'm not in Argentina right now and don't have a subscription so I can't easily look it up for myself. I'd be interested to find out what their take on the matter is, though.
 

Redpossum

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I will grab a copy and let you guys know, if my friendly corner newsstand is actually open. Who knows how the combination of new restrictions and May 25 holiday will affect things.
 

Redpossum

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The newsstand was open, (almost no one seems to be observing any lockdown here in microcentro), I grabbed a copy of La Nacion, and it has the Campo supplement. The front page has some cows and reads "Cepo a la carne, malestar, estupor, y enojo".

Translation breaks down at the first word. Carne is meat, sure, and the last three words are "discomfort, stupor, and anger", but "cepo"?

Literally translated it can be a stock chute, like at the rodeo. Or that thing they clamp on a wheel of your car when you have parked illegally. Or a medieval torture device. But of course none of those really apply. It's one of those uniquely Argentine words like "corralito"*, used to describe somewhat bizarre economic manipulations by governments of marginal competence, (and when was the last time Argentina had a truly competent government?), when they see things spiraling out of control and have no faintest ^%$&*&^@ idea what to do.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again - Argentina is to Political Science what non-Euclidean geometries are to Mathematics. The fundamental rules are just different. If you don't live here you don't understand, and no words can explain it to you. Hell, for that matter, it's entirely possible that even if you do live here, todavia no tenés ninguna jodida idea.

ANYHOW, in this case "cepo" clearly means the 30-day ban on exports of meat. I explained to the elderly man who operates the newsstand exactly why I was buying La Nacion instead of my usual idealistic leftist rag. When I mentioned the cepo, he did that explosion of outraged indignation thing that educated porteños do when confronted with government actions like this, and spent a good five minutes expounding in angry Castellano at 400 words per minute, with occasional gusts to 650, on the topic of why this is a terribad idea. (ARGH, Castellano is really ruining my English; I never used to write horrible run-on sentences like that!)

I have grown old, and a year of quarantine has done nothing good for my short-range vision. I can't read close-packed columns of small-face type in the dim evening light. I'll get to it tomorrow and try to post my own translated summary. Right now, I'm going to drink Malbec and make some pasta.

Ay, puta vida!



*I'm not suggesting that cepo and corralito are synonymous, only that they are both uniquely Argentine words in the way they are used here
 

toongeorges

Registered
Please invest! We love investors! Ok, you have invested everything? You are no longer an investor, now you are a vulture capitalist. We hate vulture capitalists. We seize your investment.

Please invest! We love investors! Ok, you have invested everything?....
Unfortunately, the problem is not only the government, but also too many voters who think they have been short-changed and are entitled to things they do not have.

Argentine politicians care more about exploiting these feelings to score votes than about doing something good for the country.
 
The newsstand was open, (almost no one seems to be observing any lockdown here in microcentro), I grabbed a copy of La Nacion, and it has the Campo supplement. The front page has some cows and reads "Cepo a la carne, malestar, estupor, y enojo".

Translation breaks down at the first word. Carne is meat, sure, and the last three words are "discomfort, stupor, and anger", but "cepo"?

Literally translated it can be a stock chute, like at the rodeo. Or that thing they clamp on a wheel of your car when you have parked illegally. Or a medieval torture device. But of course none of those really apply. It's one of those uniquely Argentine words like "corralito"*, used to describe somewhat bizarre economic manipulations by governments of marginal competence, (and when was the last time Argentina had a truly competent government?), when they see things spiraling out of control and have no faintest ^%$&*&^@ idea what to do.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again - Argentina is to Political Science what non-Euclidean geometries are to Mathematics. The fundamental rules are just different. If you don't live here you don't understand, and no words can explain it to you. Hell, for that matter, it's entirely possible that even if you do live here, todavia no tenés ninguna jodida idea.

ANYHOW, in this case "cepo" clearly means the 30-day ban on exports of meat. I explained to the elderly man who operates the newsstand exactly why I was buying La Nacion instead of my usual idealistic leftist rag. When I mentioned the cepo, he did that explosion of outraged indignation thing that educated porteños do when confronted with government actions like this, and spent a good five minutes expounding in angry Castellano at 400 words per minute, with occasional gusts to 650, on the topic of why this is a terribad idea. (ARGH, Castellano is really ruining my English; I never used to write horrible run-on sentences like that!)

I have grown old, and a year of quarantine has done nothing good for my short-range vision. I can't read close-packed columns of small-face type in the dim evening light. I'll get to it tomorrow and try to post my own translated summary. Right now, I'm going to drink Malbec and make some pasta.

Ay, puta vida!



*I'm not suggesting that cepo and corralito are synonymous, only that they are both uniquely Argentine words in the way they are used here
"todavia no tenés ninguna jodida idea." OMG! SOOOOO funny! I mean this is just over the top funny!!!!!!!!

Argentina will steal your soul and haunt you to death!
 
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Redpossum

Registered
"todavia no tenés ninguna jodida idea." OMG! SOOOOO funny! I mean this is just over the top funny!!!!!!!!

Argentina will steal your soul and haunt you to death!
This is true. And yet, may God have mercy on my wicked soul, this country has truly captured my heart. There is literally nowhere I'd rather be, and if that doesn't call my sanity into doubt, I don't know what it would take.
(bangs head on table)
 

zensailor

Registered
Please invest! We love investors! Ok, you have invested everything? You are no longer an investor, now you are a vulture capitalist. We hate vulture capitalists. We seize your investment.

Please invest! We love investors! Ok, you have invested everything?....
displays more unsubstantiated snark than intellectual understanding of the referenced events.
 

NomadTrader

Registered
displays more unsubstantiated snark than intellectual understanding of the referenced events.
I was referencing the quoted remark by toongeorges, not the initial event topic of the thread. I believe I even "quoted" toongeorges remark. Sometimes conversation flow happens that way. Toongeorges got it; and he/she/ze replied appropriately.

If you think my snark about the Argentine government's habit of begging for and then nationalizing foreign investments is 'unsubstantiated', then you haven't been paying attention.

Perhaps I should slow down and allow the conversation to progress more slowly so that everyone can keep up.

Oh, and if I didn't use snark, I would probably just cry for the sad state of humanity.
 
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Redpossum

Registered
I find that the Saturday "Campo" insert to La Nacion often reveals the real issues behind current food and farming stories that are just skimmed over by general reporting. I wouldn't be surprised if tomorrow's edition discusses this matter in some detail but I'm not in Argentina right now and don't have a subscription so I can't easily look it up for myself. I'd be interested to find out what their take on the matter is, though.
I will grab a copy and let you guys know, if my friendly corner newsstand is actually open. Who knows how the combination of new restrictions and May 25 holiday will affect things.
OK, I finally got a chance to read the article, and there are few surprises.
The agro producers have declared a strike of sorts for 9 days, saying that -

1) This is a repeat of an export ban from 2005-2015 that had disastrous consequences, leading to closing of 138 frigorificos and the decline in the cattle herds of Argentina by 10 million head.

2) Roughly 70% of the beef exported is of cuts not popular for internal consumption (I'm skeptical about this one).

3) They mention "el conflicto por la 125 en 2008", and I have no idea what that was. Anybody else have an idea?

4) The Germans are still mad about having been cut off from Argentine beef when they hosted the world cup of 2006.

In any case, the agro industrial sector is royally pissed off about this, and the CAA, the SRA, plus the breed-specific producers associations of 14 different breeds have all condemned it in fulminating, sulfurous terms. These people are really, really, really angry.
 
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