D. N. I.

steveinbsas

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The seal of the Apostille can be done by any Secretary Of State or Argentine Consulate in the US, or you can have all of the documents sent to a private company such as www.apostille.com and they will have it done and send you the documents (especially convenient if you are already in Argentina). Be sure to have all of the documents done at the same time or you will pay double for their services and for shipping, too!
I believe the requirements you listed are for a resident visa (in your case, married to an Argentine citizen).You can only apply for the DNI after you are granted the visa. That requires the resident visa, an additional "legalized" copy of your passport and a certificado de domicilo (10 pesos). The cost of the DNI itself is only 15 pesos (plus the cost of photos and photocopies) and you apply at the registro de las personas, which is a separate entity from migraciones.
 

steveinbsas

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You're welcome. If you search the bulletin board you can find several threads on the topic of visas and the DNI with more detailed information..
 

steveinbsas

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"christina" said:
anybody know if I can use the argentine line at immigrations in EZE since I now have permanent residency? (still working on that DNI...around how much is it to hire a lawyer for that?)

In early 2007 I traveled out of Argentina with the residency paper and (correctly or not) used the foreigner line when returning. The customs official didn't say anything about which line I should have been in. In April of 2008, I returned from a trip to the States and even with my DNI, I wasn't sure and went through the non resident line. It wasn't significantly longer, but I was then told by the customs official that I could use the resident line next time. I still had to wait a few minutes for my luggage, along with everyone else.Before anyone pays a lawyer to get a visa or the DNI, I hope they will read my other posts on the subject. It isn't a judicial matter and a lawyer isn't required, though they will happily take your money for services they might not even know much about. I started out paying a lawyer who was "learning on the job" as much as I was when I started the resident visa process. I proved to be a faster learner and ended up going to migraciones (for the visa) and the registro de las personas (for the DNI) without him. I went with my girlfriend and it all went smoothly.
One of the easiest requirements to comply with is the translation of the documents. There is a website listing all of the translators by barrio, speciality, and idioma. http://www.traductores.org.ar/nuevo/home/inicio/index.php
Obviously, those who translate into English speak English. It's really pretty simple...if you qualify.It would be helpful if anyone who has recently received a resident visa and gone to the registro de las personas to "apply" for the DNI could post how long the current "waiting time' is to receive a turn to submit the requisite documents, and for those who have recently done so to post on the waiting time to return to pick up the DNI itself.
 

diosaarenosa

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ok so here's the thing. i am born to an argentine mother and english father, making me automatically entitled to citizenship and an argentine passport. i keep reading about the DNI and understand this is like a a personal ID number. i approached the argentine consulate here in the UK but they said that the application would involve sending documents to and from argentina, and would take roughly 6 months. in light of the fact that i am going in november, i might as well do the whole process when i am over there. will i automatically get or be entitled to a DNI if i process my application for citizenship? it's all really confusing, but i will be hoping to rent with argentines, and i find the idea of paying extra for rents and air travel worrying. thanks.
 

steveinbsas

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I believe that anyone who has temporary or permanent residency or citizenship in Argentina is required to get a DNI. Residency and (I believe) citizenship are matters dealt with by migraciones. The DNI is issued by the resistro de las personas (aka registro civil). In order to be granted citizenship you will have to show evidence of your parentage and it will serve you well to have a number of documents prepared in the UK first. These include a "new" copy of your birth certificate (issued 2000 or later) and a report showing no criminal activity for the past five years in the UK. Both documents need the Apostille which can be done by the Argentine consulate where you are now. You may need copies of the birth certificates of you parents...certainly your father. You won't necessarily pay more to rent if you don't have the DNI. Short term leases are all that's "legally" available to non-residents and, while short term rentals are almost always more expensive, longer term leases are still a possibility. Once the Argentines here know that you are applying for citizenship you will be treated differently. This was true in my case and I am a Yankee who was only applying for a temporary resident visa...but with the intention of living here permanently. Most Argentines are pleasantly surprised by this, but a few are genuinely puzzled why why would prefer to live here when I have the (enviable) right to live in the USA.
Until you receive the DNI (a process which took me three months after reiceiving temporary residency) I don't tknow if you will be eligible for the lower domestic airfares, but its always worth asking if they will accept the papers issued by migraciones (residencia precaria) prior to receiving the DNI to benefit from the "subsidized" rates.
 

diosaarenosa

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thanks for the v v helpful info. one thing though, why would i need the birth certificate of my father if he's british?
 

steveinbsas

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Good question. Of course it's a post 2000 copy of your mothers birth certificate that you would need (it was early here when I wrote that and I was only on my second cup of coffee...). You may be able to find more detailed information at the migraciones website: http://www.migraciones.gov.ar/
 

diosaarenosa

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don't worry! and probably second rate coffee at that, going by the comments on this forum of argentina's woefully inadequate take on that caffeinated drink.
my mother only has photocopies of her birth certificates, she says i would have to source one from records over there - census? i know i have to do that in order to get a recent copy of my birth certificate here, given that the carefully preserved one my father has is, as i am, 28 years old. it's going to be an arduous drawn out process, i can see it now.
 

steveinbsas

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Unless you are planning to live here permanently or, at the least, for extended periods, I wonder what the advantage having Argentine residency would offer besides the "discounted/subsidized" domestic airfares. As I previously wrote, short term leases (up to six months) are naturally more expensive than long term, and long term (residential) leases here are for two years.

Also, once you have residency here, the Argentine tax man will want to tax your "worldwide" assets and income...if he knows about them. You are right about the coffee.
 
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