D. N. I.

Fishface

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"Attorney" said:
Its is true this does not happen in every case, but in my experience in 8 out of 10 files I have been asked this.
That's interesting - '8 out of 10' - even a lawyer knowing the process well, executing on a daily basis - still finds irregularity in the implementation of the law in immigrations.
seems that 'luck' has a big part to play in getting you paper submitted.
 

steveinbsas

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"steveinbsas" said:
I went to migraciones today to renew my visa rentista. I had the same papers as last year, along with a translation of my new passport. It wasn't quite enough. This year they are asking for a new (less than six months old) certificado de antecedentes penales en argentina. They did not ask for it when I renewed last year.
It is possible to get a form on line and pay at any branch of the banco nacion. The fees vary slightly on how fast you want to pick up the certificates (8 hours, 24 hours, or 5 days) after submitting the form and providing fingerprints. There doesn't seem to be an eight hour service, so 24 hour service is what you'll get. http://www.dnrec.jus.gov.ar/TramPerWeb/inicio.aspx
The on line information indicates that you can then "apply for" and obtain the certificado at one of the centros de gestacion publico (CGP). When I went to the CGP location closest to my apartment, they gave me a list with four locations, including Cabildo 3067 that actually issue the certificados. I also spoke with a man at migraciones who told me he obtained his certifacado at Piedras 115 (near Av 25 de Mayo.), but it isn't on the list. I'll go to the Cabildo office tomorrow and add more information as soon as I have it.

If you download the form be sure to request the "8 hour" service ( 40 pesos). If you pay less you will have to return to the bank and pay the difference before applying for the certifacado antecedentes penales. I just learned this from experience. Fortunately a banco nacion was within five blocks of Piedras 115 and the line was short. To clarify, Piedras 115 is just off Av de Mayo (not 25 de Mayo), and Piedras is actually a continuation of Esmeralda as you cross Av de Mayo.
Early this morning I checked a map and realized that Pericles 115 was very close to the Cathedral stop of linea D ( much closer than Cabildo). I arrived at 11 AM and it took less than 15 minutes (including waiting time) to show my DNI and have fingerprints scanned (after the trip to the bank). The certificado will be ready after 4 pm tomorrow (30 hour service).
 

ahmed

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Questions for the Americans here on this forum. Is it possible to obtain the certificate of absence of criminal records while here on Argentina without having to return to the US? (i.e by mail or applying online). How long would that process take and how much would it cost?
 

tangobob

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Early this morning I checked a map and realized that Pericles 115 was very close to the Cathedral stop of linea D ( much closer than Cabildo).
I knew Pericles was doing well, but I did not realise they had named a street after him!!!
 

seachioli

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Regarding to your question to how long and if you request a "certificate of absence of criminal records" from the FBI. You'll have to go the embassy and pick the form, fill it out and send it back to the FBI - it can take up to 3 months I believe. However, you can request the process to be expedited, which was the case for me because I was getting married and I need to the certificate ASAP in order for the marriage to go forward. Hope this helps.
 

steveinbsas

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Even though I was told that a criminal report from the FBI was needed to obtain a residency visa here, I simply faxed a letter to my home town police department in Rock Island, Illinois requesting a notarized letter stating I had no criminal record for the past five years. In the letter, I requested that they included my full name, date of birth, home address, driver's license and passport numbers. They composed the letter (one page with their official letterhead) and my brother picked it up within two days. He then sent it to a friend in Chicago who had the Secretary of State add the Apostille. She then sent it to me FedEx in BA. It all took less than ten days. The city of Rock Island didn't charge to write the letter, but the Chicago

police used to charge about $5.00. The Apostille was about $10 and it was

sent Fed Ex with all the other US docs for $50.When I presented the documents at migraciones in 2006 no one questioned the police report or its source. The city police report is routinely used for US citizens applying for resident visas for Mexico (and perhaps other countries). The City of Chicago even has a window at the central police station expressly for this purpose. If anyone has recently had a problem with Argentine migraciones accepting anything other than an FBI report, I hope they will share that information here. If you can do it, it still might be worth a try...and possibly a lot faster then the FBI.
 

ahmed

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Thanks for the previous responses. Few more questions: - For the FBI police record: does that still need to be legalized (or have the seal of the Apostille) as well? I think I read somewhere in this forum that it does not have to be.- I have an official birth certificate with me but its out of date (more than 10 years old). Can this still be legalized? If no, can I apply for a new one from here in Argentina? I don't have immediate family in the US to apply for one for me there.
 

steveinbsas

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"ahmed" said:
Thanks for the previous responses. Few more questions: - For the FBI police record: does that still need to be legalized (or have the seal of the Apostille) as well? I think I read somewhere in this forum that it does not have to be.- I have an official birth certificate with me but its out of date (more than 10 years old). Can this still be legalized? If no, can I apply for a new one from here in Argentina? I don't have immediate family in the US to apply for one for me there.

Yes, someone posted that an FBI report obtained from the US consulate in Argentina did not require the apostille. Be sure to check with migraciones. They are the final authority.
Two years ago I was told that copies of birth certificates must be issued no earlier than 2000 and must have the apostille. You can probably order one on line from the Secretary of State in the state where you were born.
Its easy to find the information on line by state. For example, the Secretary if State of Illinois charges $15 for a birth certificate and $2 for additional copies. They only charged $2 for the apostille (at the Chicago office), but they don't do it for on line orders. The "Index Department" performs that function and will do so if the document is sent to them.There are companies that perform these services for a fee, but be sure
to have all your documents sent to them and forwarded to Argentina in
one package. I was quoted $200 two years ago, and that included FedEx
charges to Argentina as well.
 
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