Forbes: (Argentina) Economic activity is almost dead and inflation is not even near to be defeated," he

garryl

Registered
Man, you are way outdated! Take a look:

Top 15 Countries to Find a Mail-Order Bride
  • Colombia. ...
  • Brazil. ...
  • Dominican Republic. ...
  • India. ...
  • Thailand. ...
  • Ukraine. ...
  • Belarus. ...
  • The Philippines.
Source: https://realmailorderbride.com/blog/top-15-countries-to-find-a-mailorder-bride/
Ukraine is not a top mail-order bride country. EU opens the door to Ukraine. All the beauties moved to other parts of Europe.Ukraine lost a few million in population in recent years, from 50m to 40m something. I thought Columbia and Brazil are doing well in the free world.
 

semigoodlookin

Registered
Ukraine is not a top mail-order bride country. EU opens the door to Ukraine. All the beauties moved to other parts of Europe.Ukraine lost a few million in population in recent years, from 50m to 40m something. I thought Columbia and Brazil are doing well in the free world.
But 8 million of those were mail order brides.
 

Pensador

Registered
Kinda getting a chuckle out of this thinking. How did a thread about Argentinas economy take a twist into top countries for mail order brides? :)
 

Joglide

Registered
Corruption in Argentina, like corruption in the USA, is on the level of Oligarchs doing deals with their pet politicians. Like the 20 plus years they have been "building" the Sarmiento line.
The idea that the average Argentine is a corrupt, lazy, child who cannot work is simply imperialism. Its not true. The problems are structural, and they were created intentionally to benefit the 30 or so richest families, who still own most of everything, and who still are not taxed on the vast majority of their wealth or income.

I have never been asked for a bribe for anything here, nor have customs agents taken a percentage of the stuff in my suitcase- both of which happen in countries that are really "corrupt".

Austerity has failed, every time its been used, because its not an actual economic theory- its either ideology, or an attempt to "punish" the working people, cynically ignoring the rich, who continue to prosper.

Israel, in the early 50s, did not have Austerity- they had government controlled rationing, and price and wage controls, much like the US or the UK during WW2. It was a survival technique, not an economic policy to reduce debt. And real economists consider it a failure. The debt in Israel was paid off when government-private partnerships began exporting high tech, mostly military, hardware.
Serbia is an Autocratic single person ruled state- to consider it a "success" because the completely non-transparent government has reduced some external debt, while taking over many industries and selling others to rich friends, and destroying the democratic process, is, well, dreaming.

Punishing the working class, rather than taxing the actual wealth flows, and avoiding structural reform of the financial industries, is a sham. It doesnt increase the health of the economy- it leads to cynical "revolutions" like Brexit. The UK economy, after Austerity, is mostly worse, except for the foreign cash that flows thru multinationals in the City.
I am in sympathy with much of what R writes here, though I think to call the problems 'structural' is to underplay the significance of what most economists would agree are institutional and cultural (or behavioural-psychological if you prefer): to say austerity never works is an overstatement. The purpose of austerity in the 1980s as in USA and Europe (inc UK) was to break the post-war Keynesian/corporatist consensus on wages and welfare by dismantling the establish effort-bargaining assumptions and breaking the power of unions and collective bargaining. In this they (the bosses) were relatively successful though it took mass unemployment, major social conflict, state subsidies to employers, etc to achieve. Reagan broke unions such as the air traffic controllers by utilising state emergency powers etc. So if we assume austerity is primarily about class power and breaking labor resistance to higher workloads then it can work, simply the fact that you can defeat your perceived enemy. 'Privatisation' in many countries has had the same purpose. You can also achieve similar results by consensus as the Scandinavians have done for much of the last century and Norway now has probably the best pensions and welfare system in the world. What about Argentina? I have said before that anarcho-capitalist solutions such as were tried in Chile even when the working class is broken are often a massive failure. There is also the temptation for employers to respond to cheaper labour by labour-wasting sweat shop policies rather than efficiency measures. That said, the institutional fix in Argentina looks pretty much rusted solid: creative solutions to infrastructure and other massive opportunities for investment seem to be undercut not only by very serious corruption at government levels, but also by a poverty of imagination among employers, union leaders and technocrats. Macri's response is to try and use devaluation and inflation as a way of cutting real wages and incomes but he then has massive external debt problems and no sign of high and sustained growth. So the institutional sclerosis of Argentina, coupled with the short-term cultural expectations engendered (ie cynicism and grab-what-you-can-when-you-can), sadly shoiw little sign of shifting anytime soon.
 
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