New - Wanting to move to BA asap

#11
Buenos Aires is the best place to be in LATAM if money is no object...!! with a US$5000 per month you can live like a king..!:rolleyes: and the choices are the best for all tastes...!
 

MorganF

Active Member
#12
Wow this may be the first time ever I agree bajo_cero but he's right on the mark. The only way to do it for an American here, if you want to make a non-trivial salary, is to work remotely for American companies/clients.

Also, there is a class of "permatourists" from first world countries here, who live for years, even decades on tourist visas -- but leaving every 90 days (often for a quick trip abroad to Uruguay and back, for a few hours total). I will not claim that I ever spent a decade of my life doing that, me, no, what, why would you think I would, no, no, no,
 
#13
Hi Jordan, there have been quite a few individuals, couples, and families who have shared their desire to move to "Buenos Aires" during the dozen years that I've been reading the posts here.

If you click on the magnifying glass and enter the word "move" (and after that "moving") in the search box, then click on search only in titles, leaving the space for the author (aka member) blank, you can quickly scroll down the titles and find the threads that are related to moving to Argentina.

Here are some a of my favorites from a search with the word move (just from the past couple years):

Making The Move To Bs As - Tips? Experiences?

Seeking Advice For The Move To B.a.

"Arbound" has a must read post in this thread:

Some Questions For Planned Move To Ba Later This Year

And here's a golden oldie from 2008:

Wannabe Expats

PS: It's worth noting that, according to a moderator of the forum at the time, Deb and Viviana were the same person.
 
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#14
The No, No, it can't be done people have resurfaced in this post. Actually, the world is full of the No No people. You find them everywhere, and if you are silly enough to listen to them, you wont' achieve much in life. I have never understood the psychological make up of the no no people, but fear and/ or lack of self confidence might be important components of their psychology.
Jordan, go for it. The worst thing that may happen is you have a great adventure and you return to California having failed. So what? You can later always join the no no people group and be successful at that! All it takes is the ability to say no, no, and no!
 
#16
I agree with a number of commentors. First, BA is a great city - there is a wonderful pace of life here that does better at work/life balance than in the US. But you may get frustrated with getting certain things done as a resident - its not as easy as in the US. My wife is from here - right now we only visit a few times a year, but I have permanent residency. If your income is dollar based, you will find it generally much cheaper. Last year the prices had edged up quite a bit, even for the dollar equivalent. I’m here on a visit now, and the prices are amazingly low with a 26:1 exchange rate. Good for me - but unfortunately not good for our family. They are struggling with this economy - but you’ll find most people have a “that’s life” kind of attitude about it. So if you come and get a job paying pesos, you should expect a lot of inflation, wild swings in the economy. My suggestion is to have a lot of contingency in your budget to allow for this. All that said, and especially if you are young - life is all about experiences - come down, try it, if it doesn’t work you can always go back, and your life will be richer for the experience.
 

Ries

Registered
#18
With US $5000 a month ($60k a year) you can live like a college freshman in Seattle. I have 2 sons there now, and that amount will basically get you a room in a shared apartment or house, rides on public transportation, and overpriced ramen and pizza.

I agree with the job advice, though- Argentina is a very tough place for a foreign visitor to find work, and the legal roadblocks are many. If you have no savings, international income, or very desirable skills, you shouldnt think you can just fake it here. I have known expats who are successful in BA by taking risks, finding investors, and creating businesses that conservative argentines shy from- restaurants, microbrewing, fashion, things like that- but it requires vision, lots of hard work, startup money, and creativity.
 
#19
The No, No, it can't be done people have resurfaced in this post. Actually, the world is full of the No No people. You find them everywhere, and if you are silly enough to listen to them, you wont' achieve much in life. I have never understood the psychological make up of the no no people, but fear and/ or lack of self confidence might be important components of their psychology.
Jordan, go for it. The worst thing that may happen is you have a great adventure and you return to California having failed. So what? You can later always join the no no people group and be successful at that! All it takes is the ability to say no, no, and no!
I would probably have the same thoughts as you back in the sixties when I was a young backpacker with not a care in the world. If only real life was as easy as that. :D
 
#20
The No, No, it can't be done people have resurfaced in this post. Actually, the world is full of the No No people. You find them everywhere, and if you are silly enough to listen to them, you wont' achieve much in life. I have never understood the psychological make up of the no no people, but fear and/ or lack of self confidence might be important components of their psychology.
Jordan, go for it. The worst thing that may happen is you have a great adventure and you return to California having failed. So what? You can later always join the no no people group and be successful at that! All it takes is the ability to say no, no, and no!
I totally agree with you.