Who's considering it after thinking they would never...?

legilber

Registered
Congrats on the baby!! My little girl is 3 months old and it really is true that children change your life. They change the way that you think and the way that you see the world.

We saw the other day on the news that a woman went running in Rosedal at 7:30 AM and was raped... My daughter and I would typically go for a walk everyday between 8-9 AM in Rosedal. Needless to say, we bought our flights the day after we heard this news.

For a long time the crime didn't bother me, even after having been robbed twice. But now that we have a little one, everything changed and we are now on our way out. Where my family is from, is extremely safe with lots of job opportunities and my fiancee is the one really pushing us to get out.

Its funny though, that it wasn't a difficult decision for us. You just have to think about the safety and opportunities that your children will have. For us, they will have more opportunities in the US and so we'll be moving back in February. We're first going to go for three months to see how we like it, but I have a feeling we may stay for longer term.

If you can be successful in Argentina, I guarantee you can be successful in the states. In comparison to where we're living now and where we'll be moving to, the cost of living is way cheaper and there are many more benefits. Top public schools, community activities and obviously having my family close will be great.

As much as we're worried about the US economy, in our minds Argentina is worse and will continue getting worse for the time being. I mean, Christina is trying to change the constitution so that she can become president for a third consecutive term.... Hello unconstitutional!!!

I would just say to go with your gut!
 

JWB

Registered
allcraz said:
Been here since early 2007. Have spoken positively and negatively on this forum of a city I have come to dearly love. I met my husband early on, and we never talked about making a move to the States. Never. We were happy here. We still are if we can manage to momentarily separate ourselves from all the chaos the government continues to throw at us (and everyone). We have a good life here. Family (his), friends, property, my job. He was let go after 15 years at a bank a little over a year ago and has really struggled to find something since then. I'm just wondering if there are people in our boat who have either made the move after doubting it or are currently having doubts while planning an escape route just in case? I read about everyone who can't wait to leave and who is planning to leave, but we haven't taken that mental jump yet. I guess it's really hard to picture us in the States. Just for more info, any potential move would be to Austin, Texas, back closer to my family and safety and the Hill Country and oh the list could go on. But I'll be honest. I don't picture us there. I'm worried about his English (decent but extremely far from fluent), about work, about him missing his country, family and friends even though he says he's ready for a change...

Anyway, I've just been really torn. You would think I would be excited that the Argie is the one ready to leave and make a life near MY home, but I'm nervous, and if you've been there too, I'd love to hear your thoughts.
AllCraz, what does your Husband do? One of my largest clients is based in Austin and while I can't promise anything, depending on his background I could introduce him and/or his resume to the company (they are a very large SW company).
 

allcraz

Registered
JWB said:
AllCraz, what does your Husband do? One of my largest clients is based in Austin and while I can't promise anything, depending on his background I could introduce him and/or his resume to the company (they are a very large SW company).
Nothing to do with software unfortunately. His degree is pretty general...Business Administration. He worked at Standard Bank for 15 years. He was last managing their Argencard account, which Standard bought but decided to stop investing money in...which is how he found himself out the door. I really appreciate any help, but right now I wouldn't feel comfortable trying to put him in contact with anyone since we haven't made any decisions and would not be going anywhere until late 2013 at the earliest. But again, thank you.
 

allcraz

Registered
Honestly, I think we'll just have to see if his mind makes a decision after the baby's born. Right now he's torn just like I am. One day he thinks it's a good idea and the next day he's wary to talk about it. I think the woman feels like a mother before the father feels like a father simply because she's physically carrying the child, and these doubts have definitely been exacerbated by pregnancy. He would love to live in a house with a yard but at the same time doesn't want to move to a gated community. But then I would never want to live in a home in provincia with bars everywhere and constantly fear a greater risk of being robbed. You go on vacation and either have to pay for someone to babysit your house or constantly worry while you're away that it's been broken into. Yes, I do feel safer in our PH in the city than I would in a stand-alone home. I know it happens in apt. buildings, too, but my personal feeling is that it's more likely in a house. I won't even consider living in an apt. with a cochera because I don't like those eternal seconds you're waiting for the garage to open and close. Heard too many stories of being robbed when arriving home in the car...I wasn't this paranoid before I lived here.
 

citygirl

Registered
allcraz said:
...I wasn't this paranoid before I lived here.
That's one of the biggest reasons I think about leaving. I am from NYC, lived in Paris for a bit, have traveled all over the world alone and honestly, I never was as hyper-vigilant as I am now that I live here.

You know how they say you can always tell someone has been in prison because of how they eat after they get out - hunched over, in a defensive position and constantly watching? Well, that's how I am now when walking down the street - anywhere in the world.

My friends in NY made fun of me on my last trip b/c of all the little mannerisms (not charming) that I have picked up here. Clutching your purse when walking on the street. Not feeling comfortable using my expensive phone on the street. Not putting on my jewelry when going out. All these little things that I don't even realize have become 2nd nature.

And I know people will tell me I'm being paranoid for no reason but before we get started, I will simply say that personally, I know way too many people that have been victims and yes, I'm hypervigilant now. And I hate that has become my default.
 

nikad

Registered
My husband has been here for 9 years, he has a good job at a very desirable company. Money is ok. We both are really tired of all the economy problems, insecurity, restrictions, etc. I just can´t leave my family behind and that is keeping us here. We are in out mid 30s and would love to leave and try something different in the US. Things are discouraging here, I am really tired of it all. We have a 1 yr old toddler and and 18 year old teenager ( this will be a problem if we finally decide to go )
 

nicoenarg

Registered
nikad said:
My husband has been here for 9 years, he has a good job at a very desirable company. Money is ok. We both are really tired of all the economy problems, insecurity, restrictions, etc. I just can´t leave my family behind and that is keeping us here. We are in out mid 30s and would love to leave and try something different in the US. Things are discouraging here, I am really tired of it all. We have a 1 yr old toddler and and 18 year old teenager ( this will be a problem if we finally decide to go )
It is scary when people, like you (citygirl, allcraz, etc), who have been here a long time (or are from here) are talking about things getting increasingly bad to the point that you guys are thinking about leaving.

Hopefully our plan (my wife's and mine) to stay here for another 2-3 years isn't going to be hell for us. We're in our mid 20s so I guess we can afford a mistake or two here and there.

Anyway, don't want to hijack allcraz's thread. I hope she and her husband figure something out for themselves. Good luck.
 

Iznogud

Registered
Consider this, your teenager at 18 is due for a radical change of entourage anyways.
When we finish school and enter the university circuit we forcibly shed our old schoolmate's posse and make new contacts.

Now it could be a good time, initial disorientation is part of the next step in education. Been there, done that
 

fifs2

Registered
citygirl said:
My friends in NY made fun of me on my last trip b/c of all the little mannerisms (not charming) that I have picked up here. Clutching your purse when walking on the street. Not feeling comfortable using my expensive phone on the street. Not putting on my jewelry when going out. All these little things that I don't even realize have become 2nd nature.

And I know people will tell me I'm being paranoid for no reason but before we get started, I will simply say that personally, I know way too many people that have been victims and yes, I'm hypervigilant now. And I hate that has become my default.


Ditto citygirl but the good news it took me less than a month for the defensive posturing to return to what I call normal ie handbag on the back of the chair when out, car windows open, doors not triple locked at night. The reassimilation of what you know will be easy and to echo what you, Nikad and allcraz etc have said the weariness leaves you pretty quickly too.
All craz your very honest and sincere post reminds us all how easy it is to discuss important things like having children before getting married but sometimes travel and a longterm home get left off the list. This happened to a couple of friends who sadly separated over the issue but because both were beligerent in their positions of leaving or staying in Ireland. It seems like you have great communication with your husband and moreover empathy for how he would feel without work or a family network in US. I trust and hope it works out for you.
 

kurtdillard

Registered
allcraz said:
5 to 10K to get my husband residing legally in the States? That's hard to believe.
The government charges a variety of fees in order to get an immigration visa and permament residency, they approach 1,000 USD. Plus there are the costs of getting all the documents, physical exam, vaccinations, photos, and other things required. There are some other costs people often forget about like paying to schedule your interview at the embassy and paying DHL to ship the passport with the new visa to your home. All of these add up to around 500 USD.

Legal services in the US are expensive, I suspect that Microsoft payed the firm, Tafapolsky & Smith several thousand dollars. When I paid an attorney for this type of service 8 years ago in the US I used an independent guy rather than one of the big firms like T&S, he charged 3 or 4 thousand and that was competitive with other firms at the time. You could do it all yourselves without an attorney, but I'd prefer to use a professional who ensures that things go as smoothly as possible. If you dig through the past few years of threads on this forum you can find a few threads from people who tried to do it themselves but made a mistake and ended up wasting many months.
 
Top