World Justice Project--La Nacion--Corruption, Etc

kre8ivelyXposed

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Just read in La Nacion more sobering statistics from the World Justice Project regarding corruption and impunity in Argentina. Much of this we all know already and while "not new" is still alarming at how low Argentina is on the list of countries with adequate forms of justice.

I did take notice of this sentence related to "weak laws in the right to property" (loose translation). WTF does that mean now considering that many of us own property in Argentina?

"Las agencias reguladoras son percibidas como inefectivas y los derechos a la propiedad son débiles. Otra área de preocupación es la alta tasa del crimen", continúa el informe. ´
 

EdRooney

Registered
Ha. Good point Rooney.

Locally I imagine it applies to the difficulties posed by the infamous casa tomada situation and the assumed legal rights of the squatter. Minefield both legally and socially.

We're back to investing in housing stock and allocating this on a priority basis based on legal status (seems only fair that those inside the system get priority), family needs and proximity to potential employment. No point builsing a ghetto in the middle of la pampa and leaving people there. Housing would need to be distributed to ensure that large poverty traps aren't created with stigmatised locations, as it is legal to discrimate in the recruitment process here based on where the applicant lives!
 

Matiasba

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These are the cases where you need to read between lines. An opositor newspaper shows some article about some american NGO about Argentina. Think: how powerful must this NGO has to be to get to Argentine newspapers. It MUST have some strong support, from, lets say, US government. Otherwise they just can not have access to this papers. Or if the results werent that bad, they wouldnt have published.
When I talk of the power the US embassy has in this country (and others world wide) then you talk me of conspirationist or paranoid or whatever. This is just a very little example of how they act.
 
These are the cases where you need to read between lines. An opositor newspaper shows some article about some american NGO about Argentina. Think: how powerful must this NGO has to be to get to Argentine newspapers. It MUST have some strong support, from, lets say, US government. Otherwise they just can not have access to this papers. Or if the results werent that bad, they wouldnt have published.
When I talk of the power the US embassy has in this country (and others world wide) then you talk me of conspirationist or paranoid or whatever. This is just a very little example of how they act.
Laughable.

It was them terrible yanquis what done it.

Farbeit from you to accept any culpability on behalf of Argentina.
 

Jaredberryman

Registered
Yes, the evil U.S. embassy caused La Nacion to put this into their paper just so they could make Argentina look bad. After all, what the U.S. government really wants is that Latin America collapses completely, and that the people then become slaves of the U.S. government. The powerful U.S. Argentine Embassy is actually planning a coupe any moment now so they can install their Argentine dictator. Argentina is the key to this region and the place where all the wealth is. All that pure, clean water will make the U.S. economy last for decades.

Wake up. Get real.
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
[background=rgb(252, 252, 252)]"Weak laws in the right to property" means that, let's say a major corporation spills chemicals into the water supply on your private property, you have no right to compensation. Or if your property is made completely valueless by underground fracking by a corporation led by the former Vice President, you don't have any right to sue. You know, stuff that only happens in banana republics.[/background]
I think they refer to things like corralito that was a serious restriction to property rights.

However, there were a tons of sue against the State and they were won by the victims.

So, you can sue and you can win.
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
These are the cases where you need to read between lines. An opositor newspaper shows some article about some american NGO about Argentina. Think: how powerful must this NGO has to be to get to Argentine newspapers. It MUST have some strong support, from, lets say, US government. Otherwise they just can not have access to this papers. Or if the results werent that bad, they wouldnt have published.
When I talk of the power the US embassy has in this country (and others world wide) then you talk me of conspirationist or paranoid or whatever. This is just a very little example of how they act.
La nación is the newspaper of the farmers so, I agree with you about they are always trying to biycott this goverment.

However, you don t need a strong evil to forcé this good journalist to complot against the goverment, they just do it as an editorial line.

Even is a fact that CIA was involved in the coups in south América during the 60/70, i think this is related to local political fights.

 

kre8ivelyXposed

Registered
For me the credibility of the article really is about the credibility of the World Justice Project----not the US embassy in BA or even the US government. Now if the US government is funding the World Justice Project who did this study, well, that is another matter. Consider the source!
 
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