Potentially Moving to Argentina

Pianosteve

Registered
But you can't live your lives for others; sure you can discuss, debate and advise, but ultimately people have to lead their own lives and make their own mistakes.
 
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Newman_ZA

Registered
We have looked at Uruguay as an option but in reality we have not been there to see what the life is like there. I am attracted to the relatively quick residency permit that one can get and the banking sector seems really open and stable. Things working against Uruguay is that life seems far more expensive there. Property in Argentina where we are looking to move to is cheaper and we could even buy a second plot of land or finca for the price of one plot in Uruguay. Uruguay is at least 2-3 times more expensive for something of equivalent size. Additionally, cost of living is also far higher in Uruguay. Yes there are many great reasons to move to Uruguay and live in the country but honestly, I think we are attracted to Argentina more. Simply put there are more places to see/move to and different climates than Uruguay.

What the heck is happening in Chivilcoy? Sounds like a rough place. Honestly though, we have lived in a place that is dangerous and scary and you are more likely to get murdered, get carjacked, get mugged, get your house broken into where we are now than in Argentina. Im not discounting your experiences @mc kenna and I hope that you can get some sort of resolution to your problems. We do understand the implications of moving to Argentina. Im sure we will have troubles and challenges. Thanks to all who have shared their experiences though. I do appreciate it.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Property in Argentina where we are looking to move to is cheaper and we could even buy a second plot of land or finca for the price of one plot in Uruguay. Uruguay is at least 2-3 times more expensive for something of equivalent size.
Property near Mendoza is even cheaper than where I presently live. I have no desire to move, but I enjoy looking at properties similar to mine in other areas of Argentina.

Here are two quintas that I would want to see ASAP if I was considering moving to Mendoza.

I found them on Mercado Libre in a search for "casa quintas en venta en Mendoza."


 

Pianosteve

Registered
Property near Mendoza is even cheaper than where I presently live. I have no desire to move, but I enjoy looking at properties similar to mine in other areas of Argentina.

Here are two quintas that I would want to see ASAP if I was considering moving to Mendoza.

I found them on Mercado Libre in a search for "casa quintas en venta en Mendoza."


They're very tempting Steve, though I wonder if I would become a bit of a recluse. They've even left the piano in situ for me. How would it work in practical terms: driving to the nearest town for groceries/cost of car/driving licence/postal service/ security etc? I do like the fact that all the seasons seem to be depicted in the photographs.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
They're very tempting Steve, though I wonder if I would become a bit of a recluse...How would it work in practical terms: driving to the nearest town for groceries/cost of car/driving licence/postal service/ security etc? I do like the fact that all the seasons seem to be depicted in the photographs.
My place is one km from the plaza of the nearby "village" (my term for the barrio because it is about 10 km from the center of city of Punta Alta).

On one corner of the plaza is a farmacy and the police station is near the same corner in the next block (facing the plaza).

I provide my own security and I have an alarm that my neighbors could hear. I can activate it with a panic button on my key ring which I always have with me when working outside. I also have another panic button in the bedroom. I have never had to activate the alarm except to test it.

I chased off a 19 year old potential "robber"once (four years ago) in the middle of the afternoon. I was able to identify him and he was arrested three days later.

I could call the local police station 24/7 if hear anyone outside my house at night and they would dispach officers immediately. That's never been necessary.

The local public clinic is located at the opposite corner (on the diagonal) of the plaza abd the maret where I buy meat, eggs, butter and cheese and some household supplies is in the middle of the same block as the clinic. So is a small hardware store.

I buy 10 kilo garrafas of LP gas on Friday afternoons once or twice a month from the YPF truck that comes to the same corner of the plaza as the clinic. I use the garrafas in the kitchen for cooking with a "industrial anafe" instead of using the stove. I also have a 200 kilo tank next to my house that I use for hot water inside the house. The gas for the garrafas is much cheaper than the gas for the 200 kilo tank (which must be deliverd by a YPF truck).

I buy beans, nuts, seeds and seasonings by the kilo on Mercado Libre and the shipments are delivered directly to my house, often arriving the next day. I aslo buy olive oil, balsamac vinegar, and coffee in bulk on ML. The shipping is often free.

I've also bought power tools, chain saws, lawn mowers, generators, high rpm clothes dryers, laptops and computer accessories, cell phones, antiques and decorative items for my house, as well as many of the supplies I need on Mercado Libre. Recently, I bought an acoustic guitar.

I buy pet food in 15 kilo bags from a vendor in the village at a price less than any grocery store in Punta Alta.

The driver's license station is in Punta Alta and it's easy to renew the license when necessary.

Drinking water in 20 liter bottles is delivered to my house any Saturday I send the delivery guys a message.

I pay all my bills on line, including utilities and property taxes.

I never go to the bank.

As for being a recluse, for me that's not an isssue.

Long before the plandemic a member of this forum dubbed me "The Hermit of the Pampas:"

He meant it as an insult, but I like the moniker so much I might even use it as the title of my autobiography.

You can see where I live and read more about my verson of "country life in Argentina" here:

Country Life In Argentina: What's It Really Like?

PS: Please note that I used the expression "country life" (in English) as it applies to living in the countryside, not in a closed or gated community (barrio privado).
 
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Pianosteve

Registered
My place is one km from the plaza of the nearby "village" (my term for the barrio because it is about 10 km from the center of city of Punta Alta).

On one corner of the plaza is a farmacy and the police station is near the same corner in the next block (facing the plaza).

I provide my own security and I have an alarm that my neighbors could hear. I can activate it with a panic button on my key ring which I always have with me when working outside. I also have another panic button in the bedroom. I have never had to activate the alarm except to test it.

I chased off a 19 year old potential "robber"once (four years ago) in the middle of the afternoon. I was able to identify him and he was arrested three days later.

I could call the local police station 24/7 if hear anyone outside my house at night and they would dispach officers immediately. That's never been necessary.

The local public clinic is located at the opposite corner (on the diagonal) of the plaza abd the maret where I buy meat, eggs, butter and cheese and some household supplies is in the middle of the same block as the clinic. So is a small hardware store.

I buy 10 kilo garrafas of LP gas on Friday afternoons once or twice a month from the YPF truck that comes to the same corner of the plaza as the clinic. I use the garrafas in the kitchen for cooking with a "industrial anafe" instead of using the stove. I also have a 200 kilo tank next to my house that I use for hot water inside the house. The gas for the garrafas is much cheaper than the gas for the 200 kilo tank (which must be deliverd by a YPF truck).

I buy beans, nuts, seeds and seasonings by the kilo on Mercado Libre and the shipments are delivered directly to my house, often arriving the next day. I aslo buy olive oil, balsamac vinegar, and coffee in bulk on ML. The shipping is often free.

I've also bought power tools, chain saws, lawn mowers, generators, high rpm clothes dryers, laptops and computer accessories, cell phones, antiques and decorative items for my house, as well as many of the supplies I need on Mercado Libre. Recently, I bought an acoustic guitar.

I buy pet food in 15 kilo bags from a vendor in the village at a price less than any grocery store in Punta Alta.

The driver's license station is in Punta Alta and it's easy to renew the license when necessary.

Drinking water in 20 liter bottles is delivered to my house any Saturday I send the delivery guys a message.

I pay all my bills on line, including utilities and property taxes.

I never go to the bank.

As for being a recluse, for me that's not an isssue.

Long before the plandemic a member of this forum dubbed me "The Hermit of the Pampas:"

He meant it as an insult, but I like the moniker so much I might even use it as the title of my autobiography.

You can see where I live and read more about my verson of "country life in Argentina" here:

Country Life In Argentina: What's It Really Like?

PS: Please note that I used the expression "country life" (in English) as it applies to living in the countryside, not in a closed or gated community (barrio privado).
I'll check it out Steve, but you're younger than me and I do have security concerns.. <iframe width="853" height="480" src="
" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

Pianosteve

Registered
Are you sure?

There have been 13 US Presidents in my lifetime.

PS; I'm in even better shape than when I arrived here in 2010...(the abbs are still visible).
As I say this kind of move has to be fully researched. I'm grateful for your input and will give Mendoza province serious consideration.
 
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