Thousands of Argentines, with terror of being expelled

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cbphoto

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The issue of illegal immigration only really becomes an issue when those immigrants become a burden on the society they are immigrating to. (taking jobs/money from legal citizens/immigrants...especially during economic downturns)
In Argentina I believe they turn a blind eye to overstaying the 6 month a year tourist violations (for 1st world nations, have no stats on others)... because most are bringing money into the country..that otherwise would not be here. This, I assume for the most part, cannot be said for the violations in the States.
In the States the real violators are those that hire illegal immigrants.. giving them less than minimum wage, no health benefits, overtime etc... and the government that ignores these "employers"... to keep the costs to the consumer down.
If the immigrants would have the same legal protections and benefits of a US citizen... they would become less "attractive" to hire... which would probably lead to a reduction in illegal immigration...
With much more effort by all countries, to help their neighbors to reap the benefits of what their nations have to what their neighbors have not...
 

Liam3494

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I cannot see anywhere in the quoted legal statute that specifies that you cannot stay in Argentina for more than 180 days, per se,. It does refer to the maximum length of one stay, i.e 180 days, and that you have to leave the country at theat time, but nowhere does it say you cannot come back the next day, and start your next 180 days (or more accurately 90 days and then renew/take a trip outside the country.).

I can only relate my own personal situation. When I decided I wanted to come and spend time here, I approached the Argentine Embassy in Ireland, so as to apply for the appropriate Visa. Unfortunately I do not qualify for a Rentista Visa, as I am being paid to take a sabbatical, but as this is not a permanent income, only for three years (despite the Rentista being renewable annually). In view of this, and the fact that I am not intending to take up permanent residency here, nor seeking employment, I did not fit into any of the other Visa categories... In effect I planned to be a Long Term Tourist (for want of a descriptive phrase), supported by my income from Ireland and savings.

After discussions with the Embassy, and Migracions here in BsAs, I was advised by the Argentine Embassy, that as long as I renewed my Tourist Visa every 90 days (express words were "Travel to Colonia every three months), the authorities here would be happy for me to stay for the three year period I planned to be on sabattical. I specifically asked the questions regarding how often I could make the three month trip, and was advised as often as I liked, and I also asked regarding the maximum niumber of days I could spend in any 365 day period, and was told, quite clearly, that Argentina DOES NOT HAVE A LAW limiting the number of days you can stay, only LAW regarding the renewals of the Tourist Visa, i.e. You must renew every 90 days.

As a Tax Official at home, I am aware of the Tax Rules, which are the 183 days for residency for tax purposes in any 365 day period, but that is not the same as the Immigration laws, they are two different sets of laws and regulations.
 

qwerty

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Maybe the Argentines can sneak in to Mexico illegal, fly to Argentina and apply for a work visa there :D
 

billsfan

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At some point in the future, people will see the history of these immigration laws pretty much the same as we regard now the Roman empire and its slaves...
 

Eternalnewbie

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citygirl said:
So there is no 180 day law? One of these days, I'll get my answer to this.

And back to the illegal immigrants in the US - what I find interesting and no one ever talks about is that the vast majority of illegal immigrants in the US pay into programs like Soc Security & Medicare and will never be able to access those funds. If there is a crack-down, it would be interesting to see what happens to some of these programs if those pay-ins go away.
Now that is a very interesting point.
 

steveinbsas

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qwerty said:
There is no chance in hell it can be pulled off. You pay taxes where your residence is and in the case of a perm-tourist not Argentina
Perma-tourists are living here are under the (income) taxation radar. If there ever is a serious crackdown and multiple entires are denied, the Argentine government will have to determineif they are willing to lose the gross revenue the perma-tourists spend (with and without IVA) in order to gain income tax revenue paid directly to the goverment by legal residents
 

AlexfromLA

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The law clearly states that you can only be here 90 days plus another 90 day extension on a tourist visa. If you go and try to extend your visa after that in person at migraciones, they will tell you " sorry ma'am you are only allowed to be in Argentina for 180 days, you can reapply after another 180 days has passed ".

Most people understand the implicitness of this law so they take the Uruguay route because this law isn't being enforced at the border ( it is only enforced after you do it multiple times and an immigration agent actually takes the time to look at your reentry visas closely ).

It is illegal to permanently reside in Argentina on a tourist visa.

If you have a problem with the wording of the law or how it is to be interpreted, you can simply call migraciones or go to migraciones and ask them directly.

Ask very directly and you will get a direct answer " Can I live permanently in Argentina on a tourist visa as long as I go to Uruguay for a day every three months ? ". You will get a very direct answer.

citygirl said:
So there is no 180 day law? One of these days, I'll get my answer to this..
 

steveinbsas

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Liam3494 said:
As a Tax Official at home, I am aware of the Tax Rules, which are the 183 days for residency for tax purposes in any 365 day period, but that is not the same as the Immigration laws, they are two different sets of laws and regulations.
You are a Tax Official in Ireland, right?

Just so no one from the USA becomes confused, in order to qualify for the foreign resident tax exemption I believe US taxpayers/residents can only be in the US for a maximum of 30 days per year.
 

LAtoBA

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steveinbsas said:
I don't know of any other Latin American country that has an immigration policy that is anywhere near as "lenient" as Argentina's.

Technically though, if what you say and others is true about the 180 days, it's really not that "lenient". Though I imagine you meant in the enforcement of those laws.

Speaking from personal experience, more than a handful of countries in Latin America turn a blind eye to Americans, Euros, etc overstaying their tourist visas. Typically, you are fined and sent on your way, but rarely if ever banned from visiting the country again. These countries have a legal right to deport you and some enforce the law more than others, ie, Brazil. But, still the laws would definitely be considered much more "lenient" in Latin America than in the US and Europe.
 

SaraSara

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Good luck with migraciones - if they are anything like the talent they have in the Buquebus terminals and in Ezeiza, you can ask the same question to six different employees and get six different answers.

Living in South America is a constant challenge - keeps one nimble, though.
 
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