Is Argentina Doomed?

perry

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rivardco said:
can you expand the topics to include other commodities and living standards, rather than just you apartments?

WTF?!?!

Rivardco are you trying to justify your beliefs about Argentina before coming here.
To understand Argentina and the rich culture will take much more than a few expat stories. I suggest that you come here with no preconcieved notions about life here and just enjoy the moment.
I knew very little about Argentina before I first visited and found this the best way as expectations and hopes were non existent.
 

steveinbsas

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rivardco said:
can you expand the topics to include other commodities and living standards, rather than just you apartments?

WTF?!?!


There are many threads in the forums that touch (if not focus) on the subject of the cost and the standard(s) of living here. Use the search engine and you can get the kind of information you are looking for. Apartment prices are generally a good measure of the overall health of the economy here, but if you aren't coming with a pile of money ($150K or more), I can understand your frustration with so much chit chat about real estate values.

Pericles is right. Just come and check it out for yourself whether you are in the market to buy an apartment or not...and enjoy the life here! I didn't know anything about life here either before my first visit, either. ..and I am very happy to be living in BA (especially now that I am in Belgrano).
 

Rad

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Rich culture does not guarantee investment return. It really seems like some people got offended by my original post...

For investing, you need to keep your head cool. Culture, pretty women and good weather are distractions, if you are an investor. However, if you have some spare change, want to be part of the culture and don't mind the periodic crises and non-sensical restrictions on capital flows, etc., then buying an apartment makes sense.
 

rivardco

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Point well taken! I will do exactly that. And please note that in fact I already have taken precisely that course in the very recent past - in much less "inviting" / "romanticized" settings.

I would never use reports on a discussion board alone to justify a long visit. Expats are able to offer (and on other sites do offer) a deeper and richer perspective than I have thus been able to find on this board. I have used the search feature. There are some good posts that could pass for "research", however they are rare. Usually I try to be more positive. However, in contrast with other sites with similar missions, the truth jumps off the page. We could do better. I say this only in an attempt to improve, not to criticized.

And, again, does anybody know of other sites they would recommend. I am interested in researching many locations in South America. (That's besides Google, and his sister, Google maps, which already has been generously suggested by an active member).
 

mini

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rivardco said:
I would never use reports on a discussion board alone to justify a long visit. Expats are able to offer (and on other sites do offer) a deeper and richer perspective than I have thus been able to find on this board.

Well, why don't you tell us what you learned on the other sites & we can tell you if we agree or not.

Also, maybe you could ask specific questions about what you want to know. Then we can answer.
 

rivardco

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Thanks Mini! I worried you would never ask:)

There are facts, there are second hand stories, and then there are the sum total of things that convey a "feel" of a place. I admit such a combination is rare; nonetheless, they exist.

The perspectives and comments that I would like to receive ( I have searched past threads, and have asked several times in different ways) are:

1 - I would like a better understanding regarding the concept of "standard of living". For example, how much to college graduates earn monthly? What is the distribution between the wealthy; middle class; and poor? What does a middle class life consist of? Same for a privileged life? Where do most expats fit into this social mix? Are there steriotypes and social tensions between classes?

2, How do most Argentinians (men and women) receive visitors / expats? Open, guarded, laugh behind our backs? Is it true that Argentinian men are easier to befriend then Argentinian women ...

3, What is the level of education; manners; sophistication that the general population possesses?

I know all of these questions, can be answered in one sentences (ie. See Jane run. ) I am hoping for a little more than that.

(sorry for sidetracking the thread.)
 

Lucas

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rivardco said:
Thanks Mini! I worried you would never ask:)

There are facts, there are second hand stories, and then there are the sum total of things that convey a "feel" of a place. I admit such a combination is rare; nonetheless, they exist.

The perspectives and comments that I would like to receive ( I have searched past threads, and have asked several times in different ways) are:

1 - I would like a better understanding regarding the concept of "standard of living". For example, how much to college graduates earn monthly? What is the distribution between the wealthy; middle class; and poor? What does a middle class life consist of? Same for a privileged life? Where do most expats fit into this social mix? Are there steriotypes and social tensions between classes?

2, How do most Argentinians (men and women) receive visitors / expats? Open, guarded, laugh behind our backs? Is it true that Argentinian men are easier to befriend then Argentinian women ...

3, What is the level of education; manners; sophistication that the general population possesses?

I know all of these questions, can be answered in one sentences (ie. See Jane run. ) I am hoping for a little more than that.

(sorry for sidetracking the thread.)

Look mate, forget about South America all together and move on to other continent you are so picky that it's almost unbelievable, what are you expecting?....to live in Argentina as in old U.S.A....forget it you are not going to find any countries in this continent to fulfill yours expectations, this is Argentina take it as it is, or leave it, nobody will cry for it, Argentina will not cry for you..

I am really trying to be as polite as possible but is getting on my nerves after reading so much nonsense in your posts.I will be direct with not offence indented, come over have a look around if you like it stay and do whatever you have or want to do, if you do not like it is simple as piss off and that is it.

If you are looking for a country to live on, stable with similar culture as yours free of politic conflicts or otherwise and with a wonderful whether, beaches, woman and with a relaxed environment do not look further than Australia, in my opinion the best country to live in the world. Argentina is not for you, good luck.
 

mini

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rivardco said:
Thanks Mini! I worried you would never ask:)

There are facts, there are second hand stories, and then there are the sum total of things that convey a "feel" of a place. I admit such a combination is rare; nonetheless, they exist.

The perspectives and comments that I would like to receive ( I have searched past threads, and have asked several times in different ways) are:

1 - I would like a better understanding regarding the concept of "standard of living". For example, how much to college graduates earn monthly? What is the distribution between the wealthy; middle class; and poor? What does a middle class life consist of? Same for a privileged life? Where do most expats fit into this social mix? Are there steriotypes and social tensions between classes?

2, How do most Argentinians (men and women) receive visitors / expats? Open, guarded, laugh behind our backs? Is it true that Argentinian men are easier to befriend then Argentinian women ...

3, What is the level of education; manners; sophistication that the general population possesses?

I know all of these questions, can be answered in one sentences (ie. See Jane run. ) I am hoping for a little more than that.

(sorry for sidetracking the thread.)

Good lord, I've created a monster!! I don't even have answers to those questions!

I'm sorry, your only going to get basic "see Jane run" responses from me.

1. How long is a piece of string? College educated people with how many years experience, what type of job, what industry, local company? multi national? etc, etc.
- I've heard that teachers make about 3500 pesos per month. I've heard professionals make 5000+.

There is a huge disparity between rich & poor. The middle class was quite devastated in the 2001/02 crisis. But there still is a middle class (ie. it's not as bad as Brazil).

I can't answer the rest of the question for you.

2. I imagine if your a guy, guys are easier to befriend and if you are a girl, girls are easier to befriend. But I think this is quite normal all over the world.

I find that Argentines are mostly curious about people from outside of Argentina. They always want to know where you are from. This is the very first question you will get "Where are you from". I find that they have already guessed where I'm from in their head. Then they ask me. Then they say "Oh, I thought you were from...", or "Oh, I thought I heard the blah blah accent...", etc. "Why are you here?" is the next question after where are you from. And "do you like it here in Argentina" is question number there. You must answer "Yes" on question number 3.

3. How long is a piece of string???

Sorry, I couldn't be more help!!! Just come down for a month & see. I think you'll find it very different from Colombia.
 

Kushluk

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The article is idiotic.

I don't know anything about Argentina, but I do know about China. His statements about China are on the level of babbling incoherences. He may, by chance, end up right about instability in Argentina, however that would prove nothing other than that Latin America often experiences instability.

His guesses and insights into Argentine national character seem specious and absurd. I might as well say of Americans that they are intolerantly religious, financially improvident and militant and therefore will never achieve anything.

One sees what one aims to see. . .
 
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